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Do blackberries cross-pollinate?

Discussion in 'Fruits & Vegetables' started by sandyullom, Feb 26, 2010.

  1. Feb 26, 2010
    sandyullom

    sandyullom Leafing Out

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    I want to try starting some blackberry plants and after some research would like to try both the Doyles Thornless and the Triple Crown. My question is can I plant both of these in the same area or will the cross-pollinate and lose there distinctive traits?
  2. Feb 26, 2010
    vfem

    vfem Garden Addicted

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    Good question... I have no idea. :/
  3. Feb 26, 2010
    journey11

    journey11 Garden Addicted

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    I'm sure they do, as I have been told not to plant within 500 feet of wild blackberries. However, it is easier to propagate your blackberries from shoots rather than seed (and that won't make cross-pollination an issue).

    I know the Doyles Thornless are particularly good about this because most of those I have I got from my Gpa who took them off of his patch and now I am splitting mine. It may take awhile to accumulate them, but you can expand your patch by digging out any that come up about a 8-12" from the main plant. I don't like to dig any closer than that myself, so as not to risk disturbing too much of the root on the main plant. Be sure to dig deeply enough to get some roots with it. It doesn't take a whole lot to get it going.

    I think I have heard that you can also root cuttings, but I don't know anything about that, never done it, but you might google it.
  4. Feb 26, 2010
    Hattie the Hen

    Hattie the Hen Deeply Rooted

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    :frow :frow

    As in the wild there are thousands of blackberry plants which look & taste different, growing side by side, they obviously do cross pollinate. The advice is to plant them well away from raspberries too. But I have my raspberry patch very near to wild blackberries growing just over the fence -- I have not seen any evidence of cross pollination.

    Here is some information ( on page 2 of this link):

    http://articles.sfgate.com/2007-07-28/home-and-garden/17253613_1_blackberries-rubus-canes

    Hope this helps. :D


    :rose Hattie :rose
  5. Feb 26, 2010
    patandchickens

    patandchickens Deeply Rooted

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    What Journey11 said. They may, but it will not affect you in the slightest.

    It will not change the nature of the berries, only the nature of the offspring you get from their seeds, and you wouldn't be propagating them from seed *anyhow* so who cares :p

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
  6. Feb 26, 2010
    sandyullom

    sandyullom Leafing Out

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    Is that the same with cross-pollination of peppers as well? I know that you are not supposed to plant hot and sweet together, but I always assumed it affected the fruit itself, not just the nature of the offspring from the seed. I'm confused :/
  7. Feb 26, 2010
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    With peppers, don't we know it's the seeds that can be 5-alarm HOT?!!

    Since the seeds are the offspring of the crossing, the seeds in a sweet bell pepper pollinated by a hot pepper may be hot.

    Steve
  8. Feb 27, 2010
    sandyullom

    sandyullom Leafing Out

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    okay - that makes sense.

    Thanks Steve
  9. Mar 5, 2010
    GardeNerd

    GardeNerd Attractive To Bees

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    Normally blackberries are propagated by tip layering, and thus they stay genetically identical. If a fruit falls that was cross pollinated, germinates, but you don't notice, you will begin to have a new variety growing within your old one.

    I love my Triple Crown Blackberry. It is very well behaved (for a BlackBerry) and very flavorful. The kids pick Triple Crown's fruit, but not my other thorny ones.

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