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Stringy Green beans

Discussion in 'Fruits & Vegetables' started by Carol Dee, Aug 7, 2011.

  1. Aug 7, 2011
    Carol Dee

    Carol Dee Garden Addicted

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    I think we planted BluLake grean beans. This summer they seem musch tougher and stringier than usual. Could it be the dry and hot weather we had? The second planting is coming on now. It has been a bit cooler and not so dry. So I will see if there is a diffrance then.
  2. Aug 7, 2011
    bid

    bid Garden Ornament

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    I think you are on the right track in that it is the hot, dry weather, Carol Dee. It has been so hot here the last few weeks I have just about given up on my beans. They did fine earlier in the season, but I think these 100+ degree days have not only severely affected production, but the quality as well. They just seem to develop a tougher "skin". Maybe that is some type of defense mechanism the plants are using to try and make seed? Not sure, but it kinda makes sense.
  3. Aug 7, 2011
    dinkadoo

    dinkadoo Leafing Out

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    Carol,

    Blue Lakes can be kinda funky even from planting to planting. Maybe pick the second crop just a bit smaller; this will usually work for most any type. Iplanted some Pickin and grinnin from Johnny's and they did great; till the third picking anyway. Stringy as could be. Istringed them and they ate well but alot of work! Hope the second crop does well.
  4. Aug 8, 2011
    Smiles

    Smiles Deeply Rooted

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    Yup, me too. My first two harvests from the Blue Lake beans were wonderful. We canned many jars and had about 4 good meals from them. But 6 weeks of no rain and hot, hot, hot, daily temperatures caused the pods to get tough and stringy. My pole beans seem to be stringier than the bush beans. I hope my second planting comes out better.
  5. Aug 8, 2011
    Veggie PAK

    Veggie PAK Chillin' with the herd

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    I too, had the stringy green beans my first year and I was really dissappointed. I was crushed! They were impossible to chew up! How could something I worked on so hard be so bad?

    After that experience, I searched all the catalogs that I thought were from good caretakers of the earth, and found Johnny's Selected Seeds in Maine. I tried their Fortex green beans which are reputed to be virtually stringless. I couldn't agree more! I have grown them for... I think four years now. They are the only green beans I'll grow.

    This year, I parallel planted six 20 foot rows. Each row had two rows of seeds running 3 inches apart down the length of the row. The equivalent of two rows of seeds. I was trying for a combination of succession planting and intensive gardening. One month after that, I planted a row straight down the middle of the length of the row.

    I planted the first time on April 30th, and picked the last eating beans on July 23rd, 2011. I'm using the rest for my seed crop.

    I ended up with 97 1/4 pounds of fortex green beans, which equated to 94 quarts of canned green beans! Everyone in my entire family as well as friends loves them for the flavor and for being stringless.

    I highly recommend them. The seeds can be a little pricey, but you pay for what you get in my book. They're worth it!

    Here is a link to one of my blog posts specifically about how I did these Fortex Green Beans. You may want to check it out.

    http://backyardorganicvegetables.blogspot.com/2011/06/modified-intensive-gardening-combined.html
  6. Aug 8, 2011
    Carol Dee

    Carol Dee Garden Addicted

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    THANKS for the tip veggie pack.

    Another question. I have avoided putting up grean beans because memories serves that they where *squeaky* and unpleasant. But DH planted way to many to eat fresh. So.... what is the best way to preserve them? I have a canning kettle. I no longer have a presure cooker it went out with the rest of the kitchen after the house fire 4 years ago. Never replaced it as I did not think I would be doing anything with it! Tips please. Thanks....
  7. Aug 8, 2011
    lesa

    lesa Garden Addicted

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    Only a pressure canner for beans, Carol... They are a low acid food. You can try freezing them after blanching- but I find them very unsatisfactory. Same thing happened to my beans this year. Early crop was wonderful. Later they were very tough. I have planted a second crop and still have high hopes. We will see!
  8. Aug 8, 2011
    Carol Dee

    Carol Dee Garden Addicted

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    That was what I thought. I might have to try to find a used one to fit the budget or borrow one. Hmmm, I wonder if Mom still has hers.
  9. Aug 8, 2011
    vfem

    vfem Garden Addicted

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    This weather has been terrible on beans! :he I finally ripped out my plants before the weekend. So angry with how chewy and curly and small they ended up being. :hu What gives?! Beans were always abundant and easy until this year. I guess I will just have to look forward to 2012, there are no beans to can this time around. :plbb
  10. Aug 8, 2011
    Hencackle

    Hencackle Garden Ornament

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    I had the same problem whenever I planted Blue Lake beans. That's why I switched to Emerite beans. I tried Missouri Wonder once, just once. Those were unfit for eating, even when picked young.

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