Becoming an agronomist?

wifezilla

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Well...it might be like me becoming a nutritionist... I have been low carbing for 5 years. I would have to give wrong answers to pass test and would have to be quiet during lectures and not say what I think.
 

sparkles2307

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wifezilla said:
Well...it might be like me becoming a nutritionist... I have been low carbing for 5 years. I would have to give wrong answers to pass test and would have to be quiet during lectures and not say what I think.
That's kind of what I was thinking.


I've been interested in agronomy for about 4 years, and there are a lot of openings in that field most of the time. Really I'd be happiest managing a grain elevator tho....
 

seedcorn

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sparkles2307 said:
wifezilla said:
Well...it might be like me becoming a nutritionist... I have been low carbing for 5 years. I would have to give wrong answers to pass test and would have to be quiet during lectures and not say what I think.
That's kind of what I was thinking.


I've been interested in agronomy for about 4 years, and there are a lot of openings in that field most of the time. Really I'd be happiest managing a grain elevator tho....
Don't think so as you have no idea how much abuse they take--both jobs. An agronomist has to be open minded, understand the difference between what they wish was true and what is. Grain elevators are in no win position as they have to make money to stay in business, be able to sell what they buy, and keep the producers happy in trying to explain why all the docks on their grain. I assume you are talking about grain, commercial ag and not vegetables or specialty crops.

Quick quiz, what do you tell farmer that produces GMO grain cheaper per unit produced and lot less management/problems? If he produces non-GMO's, less yield and NO MARKET to get the premium and more expenses to produce. Understand he wants to stay in business as this is his living, not passing hobby.

There are a lot of open positions in Ag for those that are trained and willing to work 50+ hours/week.
 

sparkles2307

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seedcorn said:
sparkles2307 said:
wifezilla said:
Well...it might be like me becoming a nutritionist... I have been low carbing for 5 years. I would have to give wrong answers to pass test and would have to be quiet during lectures and not say what I think.
That's kind of what I was thinking.


I've been interested in agronomy for about 4 years, and there are a lot of openings in that field most of the time. Really I'd be happiest managing a grain elevator tho....
Don't think so as you have no idea how much abuse they take--both jobs. An agronomist has to be open minded, understand the difference between what they wish was true and what is. Grain elevators are in no win position as they have to make money to stay in business, be able to sell what they buy, and keep the producers happy in trying to explain why all the docks on their grain. I assume you are talking about grain, commercial ag and not vegetables or specialty crops.

Quick quiz, what do you tell farmer that produces GMO grain cheaper per unit produced and lot less management/problems? If he produces non-GMO's, less yield and NO MARKET to get the premium and more expenses to produce. Understand he wants to stay in business as this is his living, not passing hobby.

There are a lot of open positions in Ag for those that are trained and willing to work 50+ hours/week.
Thanks for the assumption SC. You're reward is the knowledge that in fact I HAVE worked in a grain elevator and it was by far the most rewarding job I've ever held.

I cannot deny the financial side of GMO, which is the seller and makes it nearly impossible for anyone to NOT go GMO. I'd tell the farmer to do what he can afford. It's his own personal issue to be convicted about it and I'm not going to tell him different. But, if I could plant seeds of change while selling seeds of grain I'd be ok with that.
 

seedcorn

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My apologies, I didn't realize you had already run a grain mill where you bought and sold grain. The people that have to deal with the public take a lot of abuse. Interesting that you enjoyed the abuse, not me.

If you truly want to work as an agronomist, there is a huge need for them. Average pay, long hours but if you enjoy working w/farmers and seeing improvements, it is an interesting life. Get your Ag BS from a university (if you don't already have one) and put your name in the loop. It won't be long till people will be calling.
 
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