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Cloning tomatoes

Discussion in 'Plant Propagation' started by valley ranch, Jun 16, 2015.

  1. Jun 16, 2015
    valley ranch

    valley ranch Garden Addicted

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    For some reason I'm not able to post a picture straight away, but can on the second post.

    I'm sure some of you clone, I'd like to quickly show how I do it.

    First I pluck an upright growth between the main stem and the outward true leaf. I didn't take a picture of what I just spoke of. This morning while planting clones I thought I'd take a couple flicks..
     
  2. Jun 16, 2015
    valley ranch

    valley ranch Garden Addicted

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    Here you go, this has been sitting in a jar of water for several days, today I think there are roots enough.
     

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  3. Jun 16, 2015
    valley ranch

    valley ranch Garden Addicted

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    I bury the clone in very damp decomposed wood we gather form our mountain spread. I bury them deep, covering most of the plant.
     

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  4. Jun 16, 2015
    valley ranch

    valley ranch Garden Addicted

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    These are in front of the only clear glass in the greenhouse to get used to the sun before setting out in the growing area.

    Burying the clone deep as I can allows for greater rooting area along the stem.

    That be it!

    Richard
     

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    journey11 and digitS' like this.
  5. Jun 16, 2015
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    I don't.

    However, I've wondered about doing this with peppers. They are perennials and I'd imagine that they would take to this treatment okay.

    Why I've thought there might be an advantage is that pepper plants in the garden could be used, without lifting the entire plant to bring in during the fall. There would be much less indoor room required through the winter than if one moved a potted plant indoors.

    I know that some southern gardeners clone tomatoes in the fall. @valley ranch will you leave your plants in containers for the season or longer? How do you think it would work for peppers?

    Steve
     
  6. Jun 17, 2015
    valley ranch

    valley ranch Garden Addicted

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    Hi, I've had better luck overwintering peppers than tomatoes. I'm not well set up for keeping plants inside, I do keep a few.
    I'll put all the plants into the earth with only a few exceptions.

    Pepper cloning, can be done, I've done it, it isn't easy and there is more failures. I tried it in the house, I'm sure under the same conditions, greenhouse, it would work better. If a person cloned in spring or summer the chances, I think, are better than at the end of the year, even the greenhouse is cooler.

    It's very warm in the high desert now, in the greenhouse it's very warm in deed.

    Richard
     
  7. Nov 15, 2015
    SprigOfTheLivingDead

    SprigOfTheLivingDead Deeply Rooted

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    I've had mostly failures with cloning peppers, and the guys at the local indoor growing store I frequent all say the same thing @valley ranch did: it can be done, but the failure rate is so high that it might not be worth your time.
     
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  8. Feb 16, 2016
    Circle-M-Farm

    Circle-M-Farm Attractive To Bees

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  9. Feb 16, 2016
    valley ranch

    valley ranch Garden Addicted

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    Air layering might work. I'll might try it with a plant in the ground, put one branch down and cover it with soil, or in a pot next to the plant. Once in a while they take hold, maybe also the use of rooting hormone, willow or aspirin.
     
  10. Feb 16, 2016
    Circle-M-Farm

    Circle-M-Farm Attractive To Bees

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    What your describing is Layering, I'm talking about Air Layering.
    I think that you would get a better result from Air Layering and you can get a lot more clones off of one mother plant.
     

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