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Crop Rotation: What should follow tomatoes?

Discussion in 'Fruits & Vegetables' started by wifezilla, Dec 26, 2010.

  1. Dec 26, 2010
    wifezilla

    wifezilla Deeply Rooted

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    I have a great garden bed that produced loads of tomatoes last year. Because it gets such good Southern exposure I have ben thinking of putting my melons in that bed in Spring.

    My other options include a 3 sisters garden (sweet corn, pole beans and pumpkins together), or maybe even cabbage.

    Anything I should definitely NOT plant in that spot other than more tomatoes?

    The only bugs in that spot were some roly polies and a few slugs the ducks missed.
     
  2. Dec 26, 2010
    beavis

    beavis Deeply Rooted

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    Here are a few suggestions I found from a web article:


    Simple Four-Year Crop Rotation
    To follow a simple four-year crop rotation, divide your garden into four areas or plots: Plot One, Plot Two, Plot Three, and Plot Four. In each of the next four years, grow a different crop or different members of the four crop families in a different plot following this rotation:

    Plot One: Tomato family (year 1); Onion family (year 2); Bean family (year 3); Cabbage family (year 4).
    Plot Two: Cabbage family (year 1); Tomato family (year 2); Onion family (year 3); Bean family (year 4).
    Plot Three: Bean family (year 1); Cabbage family (year 2); Tomato family (year 3); Onion family (year 4).
    Plot Four: Onion family (year 1); Bean family (year 2); Cabbage family (year 3); Tomato family (year 4).

    This four-year crop rotation intersperses members of the other vegetable families among members of the Tomato, Onion, Bean, and Cabbage families. Here is how they are grouped:

    1. Tomato Family and others (Solanaceae family)
    Tomatoes
    Peppers
    Eggplant
    Potatoes
    Beets
    Carrots
    Celeriac and celery
    Parsnips
    Salsify
    Scorzonera

    2. Bean Family (Leguminosae family)
    Peas
    Broad (fava) beans
    French (green) beans
    Runner beans

    3. Cabbage Family and others (Brassica family)
    Broccoli
    Brussels sprouts
    Cabbages
    Calabrese (Italian sprouting broccoli)
    Cauliflowers
    Radishes
    Rutabagas (Swedes)
    Turnips

    4. Onion Family and others (Allium family)
    Garlic
    Leeks
    Lettuces
    Onions
    Shallots
    Sweet corn
    Squashes, zucchini, and pumpkins (marrow and courgettes)
     
  3. Dec 26, 2010
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    Beavis that all seems very sensible and straightforward (altho' the Brassica family is a family and no others are included in #3).

    The other 2 "others" families are probably useful groupings.

    I have found that tomatoes benefit from a little less irrigation water than some plants. It may well have to do with the fact that irrigation is all from overhead sprinklers in my gardens. And, warm-weather tomatoes have some trouble ripening here. Somewhat less irrigation than the rest of the garden limits disease problems with the plants and fruit and hastens ripening late in the season.

    Pumpkins and squash also seem to appreciate less irrigation and sweet corn, at least, tolerates it. Therefore, my tomato patch races around the perimeter of the garden following the pumpkins, squash and sweet corn.

    I think that melons should be included in that #4 group and, altho' they are a cucurbit, cucumbers should not. At least, cukes have water needs beyond that of pumpkins and watermelons, for example.

    . . . just some thoughts, and not really having anything to do with "nutrient needs" which should, I suppose, be taken into consideration.

    Steve
     
  4. Dec 27, 2010
    wifezilla

    wifezilla Deeply Rooted

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    Cucumbers are going in to the pond watering system and this patch is right along the path to the duck pen. No chance of whatever I plant there ended up being ignored.

    I just can't decide if I am going to put the melons there or the 3 sisters garden. I thought some sciency stuff might tip the scales.

    No tipping yet :p
     
  5. Dec 27, 2010
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    You mean they do a relay?
     
  6. Dec 27, 2010
    lesa

    lesa Garden Master

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    Wife, the thing you should not plant in that spot is more tomatoes, or potatoes. Did you end up with a blight problem, I can't remember...I think melons would be fine. I love the notion of crop rotation, but even though my garden is large, it is not big enough to wait 3 years, before planting certain things. Every other year, is about the best I can do...
     
  7. Dec 27, 2010
    beavis

    beavis Deeply Rooted

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    Radishes
     
  8. Dec 27, 2010
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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  9. Dec 27, 2010
    wifezilla

    wifezilla Deeply Rooted

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    Radishes out here are flea beetle magnets. Argg.

    As for taters, I only grow sweet potatoes and I grow those in containers.

    So lets do a poll. What would you plant in the old tomato bed?

    3 sisters garden or melons?
     
  10. Dec 27, 2010
    beavis

    beavis Deeply Rooted

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    Whoops my bad Steve.

    Never knew that
     

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