1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Official TEG Poll: What is your garden style?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. A "cute" garden bug is eating ALL my peas!!! - Featured Thread
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  4. TEG Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice

Put in a pond?

Discussion in 'Everything Else Garden' started by Lavender2, May 6, 2014.

  1. May 6, 2014
    Lavender2

    Lavender2 Garden Addicted

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2009
    Messages:
    1,414
    Likes Received:
    1,140
    Trophy Points:
    257
    Location:
    MN. Zone 4/5
    We have finally made the VERY difficult decision to take out our pool. :(
    We've had a pool for 26 years, it was a wonderful asset for my daycare - teaching many kids how to swim, and water safety. The liner needed to be replaced this year and the cost/use factor just wasn't justified... not to mention the pool maintenance crew (ME) had threatened to quit. Our daughter has a pool, and son most likely will put one in soon, so that helped our decision a bit - DH disassembled most of it last weekend.

    Anyway, now moving on - DH is imagining grass seed :rolleyes:, but yeah he knows better - last year we acquired a bunch of granite cobblestone pavers, I have to do the math yet, but I think enough to do a nice size patio. I also have a preformed pond liner (acquired years ago, but never made it onto the list before) - my son has a filter and pump for me and the power is already there...and I think I want a pond garden. :)
    SO, pond owners out there - how much work is a small pond? Tips?, ideas? photos? (please don't side with DH :p )
     
  2. May 6, 2014
    Smart Red

    Smart Red Garden Master

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    11,302
    Likes Received:
    7,314
    Trophy Points:
    387
    Location:
    South-est, central-est Wisconsin
    I don't find my small pond -- just big enough for my son's dog -- to be much of a problem or much work. Although, I do intend to redo the whole thing later this summer to make keeping the weeds down easier by making the edges mow-able.
    fish pond.JPG
    Mini-papyrus, curly reeds, and two water lilies sit in the water along with a dozen-ish goldfish, an increasing number of different frogs, and lots of toad tadpoles. Occasionally a passing bird will bring in fish eggs that hatch or (once) a blood sucker that faired well until it latched onto me.

    Leaves in the fall is my biggest problem -- that and no electricity. . . . yet. . and I do know how to address that if I choose. Of course, I bring the fish inside for the winter. That could be a bit more work if I didn't have the sunroom to winter them in.

    Even with your husband's patio taking up part of the space, there is NOTHING so relaxing as the sound of falling water. I love watching the variety of birds attracted to my pond by day and love watching the bats swooping down to get a drink or to catch an insect attracted to the (solar) lights. It is a whole new learning environment for the little ones.

    Hopefully, once the pond is redone, we can keep DS's great Dane from jumping in for a dip.
     
  3. May 6, 2014
    so lucky

    so lucky Garden Master

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2011
    Messages:
    8,020
    Likes Received:
    4,293
    Trophy Points:
    377
    Location:
    SE Missouri, Zone 6
    Ooh! I don't have any experience with ponds, but you have my vote! Sometimes things that are a little trouble are well worth it.
     
    Lavender2 likes this.
  4. May 6, 2014
    canesisters

    canesisters Garden Master

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    5,483
    Likes Received:
    6,662
    Trophy Points:
    347
    Location:
    Southeast VA
    humm.... tough decision......... NOT!

    I vote yes for the pond.
     
    Lavender2 likes this.
  5. May 6, 2014
    ducks4you

    ducks4you Garden Master

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    Messages:
    5,599
    Likes Received:
    2,864
    Trophy Points:
    367
    Location:
    East Central IL, Was Zone 6, Now...maybe Zone 5
    I put bricks down at ground level so that I can mow around my beds by running the wheels of my push behind mower right over the bricks. Maybe you could do that at the bottom of your pond? I HATE, HATE, HATE the 5 minutes of work/55 minutes of repair using string trimmers!!!
     
    Lavender2 likes this.
  6. May 6, 2014
    Smart Red

    Smart Red Garden Master

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2012
    Messages:
    11,302
    Likes Received:
    7,314
    Trophy Points:
    387
    Location:
    South-est, central-est Wisconsin
    I am removing the limestone and putting down a 2-3 foot circle bigger than the pond of river rock over landscape material. Then I will put some type of stepper around the pond edge and bury the same steppers around the outside edges of the rock. Then I can just mow along the steppers to get all the grass.

    The falls needs to be redone as well. I do have a solar fountain that recycles the water so that green hose isn't running to the pond all the time.
     
  7. May 6, 2014
    ducks4you

    ducks4you Garden Master

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2009
    Messages:
    5,599
    Likes Received:
    2,864
    Trophy Points:
    367
    Location:
    East Central IL, Was Zone 6, Now...maybe Zone 5
    It's SO PRETTY!
     
  8. May 6, 2014
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    Messages:
    15,768
    Likes Received:
    15,276
    Trophy Points:
    437
    Location:
    North Idaho 48th parallel
    Definitely pond Lavender! But I've never had one and don't have a bit of experience with the upkeep so my vote doesn't carry much weight.
    Sounds like a fun project, and one that will require more plants....and that's always a good thing! :D
     
    Lavender2, canesisters and ducks4you like this.
  9. May 6, 2014
    Nyboy

    Nyboy Garden Master

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2010
    Messages:
    21,366
    Likes Received:
    16,167
    Trophy Points:
    437
    Location:
    White Plains NY,weekends Lagrange NY.
    I love my ponds have small one in city and very large natural one in country. Can be a lot of work in begning, if you want fish more work. Once pond has been up and runing only few mintues a week. unlike a garden, the bigger you go the easlier it is to keep. The smaller the pond the less forgiving it is.
     
    Jared77 and Lavender2 like this.
  10. May 6, 2014
    Carol Dee

    Carol Dee Garden Master

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    10,635
    Likes Received:
    11,967
    Trophy Points:
    397
    Location:
    Long Grove, IA
    Since you have most of the big items to get started I say go for it. As for wintering the fish over we put them in a stock tank in the unheated lean to on the garage with a stock tank heater just warm enough that ice does not form.
    Our Koi pond is not real big. Rectangular with a small upper pool that flows over a rock ledge into the lower part. It is filtered and sent up onto the deck where is runs out of an antique hand pump into a 1/2 whiskey barrel that then empties into the upper pool. I will try to get a good photo of the set up. It is home to about 6 med/lg Koi and assortment of frogs/toads. Several water lilies and a cattail.
    Like Red said it is so relaxing to sit and listen to the water and critters. Although having it right outside the BR the toads do court LOUDLY! ;)
     

    Attached Files:

    Jared77, happy acres, pjn and 2 others like this.

Share This Page