What Did You Do In The Garden?

digitS'

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A long 3 hours of running sprinklers in the distant garden. Set-up is still a new experience and already on a rotating basis to try to cover ... uhm, my bases. (That is an American baseball, for those outside of the US ;).)

At one point, we took a short drive into the nearby hills. There is a few square miles with a public hiking trail and primary access on the other side of the mountain. I was checking to see if I still could find the "secondary" - which the park department doesn't mark on its map. Been there before. I didn't actually become lost ;) but only allocating 90 minutes for the round trip didn't allow much time for having to turn around twice. It seems like a good plan for a Sunday hangout when our usual haunts while sprinkler-waiting are probably packed with people.

I re-measured the garden to see if the sprinkler placement was the best and my paths were located as I'd intended. You know the saying "measure twice, cut once." Heel/toe, heel/toe with my big feet and a stick for balance - across the 200' length. It was good! Satisfying but I was hit by a sprinkler a couple of times on the trek.

Steve
 

digitS'

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It was one of these hills where we went, just a ways south. And no, if there is snow up there, it's down under the trees and melting. Just thought I'd show you how time spent waiting on irrigation can be gainfully employed and cool you off if'n you are experiencing hot weather like here (at a lower elevation). Supposed to be well over 90°f (30C) this afternoon.
 

seedcorn

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Last try was successful! Getting about a 50% germ. Real light colored and spindly look to them. The different variety isn’t up yet. Hated to lose the old variety as it was a dwarf that produced a lot of long pods that were tender to 6” long. Maybe it’s been inbred too long?
 

flowerbug

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was a perfect day out there for temperature and with a nice breeze and some sunshine too. normally i start the day by checking the birdbaths and refreshing the water in them or hosing them out good if they have some crud in them. then i also will water whatever needs it. then i finished up the weeding in one garden i started yesterday so i could then also water that garden. moved on to the next garden and gladly it was in much better shape so i had it done in less than an hour even if it was seven times the size of the other garden that took me four hours to weed. there were a lot of very tiny purselane plants starting up and i had to scrape underneath and between each bean plant. yes, that takes a bit of time and patience. :)

took a break for a bit this afternoon and then wanted to go back out and fix up the end of the driveway, but Mom had other ideas and didn't want me to do it so instead i worked on screening gravel from along a pathway that i dumped there many years ago because it had so much dirt in it i thought i would gradually pick the gravel out of the dirt through the years. except instead i just planted som irises there for many years and they did ok, but eventually too many weeds invaded along that edge and it was too much work to keep it cleared of weeds and weeding was too hard because the gravel in the dirt made it almost impossible to pull or dig out roots of weeds. so after removing the irises a few years ago i decided to build a screening box for the gravel and dirt so i could get it all done at last. this is like 10-15 years later so finally i'm getting the gravel out of the dirt and then it makes the gardens much easier to scrape too since i'm not hitting all that gravel. it may be a few years yet before i really get it cleaned up to the level i find tolerable but i have to start somewhere, and besides if you figure that at times i spend some minutes picking the gravel out of the dirt anyways by screening it that does end up saving me a huge amount of time... eventually. it's ok, it's something different no matter how it gets done and i have many thousands of square feet of gravel mulch around here along gardens so it's not an uncommon task for me to have to herd gravel back into a pathway as it has escaped into a garden.

of course i do daydream of a machine which can suck up the gravel and do the screening and washing and then replace the gravel from where it came from without me having to do the scraping or washing or moving, but that's just a daydream... :)
 

Cosmo spring garden

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Watered the new bush bean and corn plot. Ran the sprinkler for hours to make sure it was watered in well. We were supposed to get rain the last three days and got a short Sprinkle yesterday. Not enough for watering the garden. Oh well.

Found two dead sweet potato plants. Something ate the roots. I found a burrow so I stuck the hose in there and ran water in it for fifteen minutes. It probably didn't do much but it made me feel better lol.

Also harvested some beans for a side to go with lunch. And two cucumbers.

Not garden related but I am organizing my pantry and I found quiet a lot of canned pickles. So I won't have to can pickles!
 

Zeedman

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My brother & I finished the garden fences today. The seedlings for Atlas & Grandma Gina's beans, and Galante yardlong bean, were large enough - so I transplanted them into their final spots in the garden. All of the beans, soybeans, and Painted Mountain corn planted on 06/22 are beginning to emerge, so gave them a good watering to help them break through. Weather permitting, I should get all but 3 of the potted legumes & cucurbits transplanted tomorrow.

Saw 2 large voles today, running across both gardens, so I put some traps out close to the new transplants. Better safe than sorry.

A few of the two rescue soybeans (Bei 77-6177 & Sapporo Midori) have sprouted, I will pot them up tomorrow. Both should still have time to mature a little seed :fl I will protect them from frost if necessary. I believe SSE has Bei 77-6177, but Sapporo Midori is irreplaceable - and my largest-seeded edamame.

A crew from SSE came today, to do an interview for this year's virtual-only "campout". They were very friendly & not in a hurry; we talked for over an hour, about SSE, and a wide range of garden topics. The interview will be edited & posted some time next month.
 

digitS'

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Does this mean that we may see you in an online video, @Zeedman ?!

It’s Great that your brother is working with you. I can hardly imagine ... my one sibling and I have never had a close relationship. I have been nearly the sole reason for contacts for the last 10+ years. The exception was after his estrangement from Dad. Then, Dad negotiated a visit in his peculiar way only to result in another blowup. Sometimes I wonder about each of our reclusive personalities and wonder how we arrived where we are.

427A45D6-2401-43DE-A0C2-3782399981A5.jpeg

Our western sky, this morning at 5.

Steve
who kept the Sapporo soybeans you sent me going for a number of years thinking that something from Sapporo Japan just had to be right for here ;)
 

meadow

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I will clean out a chest freezer to dedicate it for seed storage, and begin packaging & transferring as much as will fit. Hopefully I can still maintain much of the collection, on a reduced renewal schedule... but a lot of commercial varieties (or even widely-grown heirlooms) will likely be dropped, so I can focus on those most in need of preservation. I'll post a list when I know which varieties will be dropped, and offer seed to anyone interested.
Will Mesa be on your keeper list?

I intended to send all of the seed to you, which will be quite a bit (judging by what I can see through the mosquito netting, which limits my view, but my guess is there are TONS of pods! 😁🥳). Anyway, maybe you'd prefer a set amount rather than the whole crop. Let me know.
 

Cosmo spring garden

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My brother & I finished the garden fences today. The seedlings for Atlas & Grandma Gina's beans, and Galante yardlong bean, were large enough - so I transplanted them into their final spots in the garden. All of the beans, soybeans, and Painted Mountain corn planted on 06/22 are beginning to emerge, so gave them a good watering to help them break through. Weather permitting, I should get all but 3 of the potted legumes & cucurbits transplanted tomorrow.

Saw 2 large voles today, running across both gardens, so I put some traps out close to the new transplants. Better safe than sorry.

A few of the two rescue soybeans (Bei 77-6177 & Sapporo Midori) have sprouted, I will pot them up tomorrow. Both should still have time to mature a little seed :fl I will protect them from frost if necessary. I believe SSE has Bei 77-6177, but Sapporo Midori is irreplaceable - and my largest-seeded edamame.

A crew from SSE came today, to do an interview for this year's virtual-only "campout". They were very friendly & not in a hurry; we talked for over an hour, about SSE, and a wide range of garden topics. The interview will be edited & posted some time next month.
Please post a link here for that interview if you don't mind sharing :).

On a side note, every single one of the walking onions have sprouted and are thriving!
 

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