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What kind of (fruit) trees are these?

Discussion in 'Trees & Shrubs' started by thejenx, Jan 18, 2019.

  1. Jan 18, 2019
    thejenx

    thejenx Deeply Rooted

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    I came across a foundation that sells fruit trees really cheap. Only 2,5 euros per tree, delivery is 5 euros. You have to buy at least 10 trees. The trees are 3 years old.
    They have these available: Navajo, Discovery, Doyenne du comice,
    Conference, Jonagold, Cupona, Dabinette, Bellida, Gala, Thimo, Elstar, Fuji, Wilton, Deljona, Santana, Appana, Maribelle

    I can't seem to find anything on these four:
    Cupona,
    Thimo,
    Deljona,
    Appana

    Does anyone here know what they might be? All the others are apples and pear trees.
     
  2. Jan 19, 2019
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    the foundation doesn't have a website or contact # or e-mail?

    i only recognized a few as apples.
     
  3. Jan 20, 2019
    thejenx

    thejenx Deeply Rooted

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    Yes they do, but they don't know either or don't have time to respond. They got the trees from a nursery that were gonna destroy them as they were unsellable because of little defects. I'm not even sure if it possible to order which trees you want. I've read from others that ordered that they could only say how many apple and how many pear trees they wanted.
     
  4. Jan 20, 2019
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

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    Of course, the Doyenne du comice is a pear so I guess those are pears listed before it and apples, after.

    I should know something about pears and apples. I live near the major apple growing region of the US and once lived, essentially, in a pear orchard in southern Oregon. Should know something but I'm ready to admit that I don't.

    I'll just say that the Comice is the pear often to be found in the stores later in the harvest season. Fuji and Gala apples are very commonly available here and I like them just fine. Jonagold seems to be a very popular choice for homeowners. It's been sold by the nurseries for a very long time and advertised for both eating fresh and for cooking.

    I once owned some apple trees but none on your list. The apples and French prunes were left behind when the property was sold. (This far north isn't best for pears, a-pear-antly ;).)

    If you have local information on variety choices, I'm sure that it would be a very good idea to consult them. Fruit trees really have geographical preferences.

    Steve
     
  5. Jan 20, 2019
    Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Garden Master

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    I wonder if your agricultural ministry would know? Does yours have a public service section you could ask? It would be nice to know they are suited to your climate.

    I wonder how many trees they have available and what kind of defect would be that widespread? How minor are those defects. Were they involved in a transportation accident that may have smashed them? Did someone mess up on the tags so they really don't know what varieties the individual trees are? A fruit tree can be fairly expensive to buy but it is also an investment in space and time. It can be years before you know if it is a good one. Do you know if they are dwarf, semi-dwarf, or full-sized?

    I'd be cautious in getting those though you may be more adventurous than me. If I wanted an apple or pear I'd be tempted to get exactly what I want even if the initial cost were more. You may get lucky and be very happy with what you get but I'm thinking more on time and space commitments more than initial costs. If yo have the space it could be worth the adventure to you.
     
  6. Jan 24, 2019
    ducks4you

    ducks4you Garden Master

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    Don't buy them. I have to replace a Johnathan apple that didn't make it, and it was cheap (WM gardening center), and it had blight and other problems, plus it never really produced. I intend to purchase it's replacement at a locally owned nursery and I want a cultivar that has as much resistance to disease as is possible. I have two apple trees, one a nondescript red, which hasn't produced for 2 years straight, and the horse's golden delicious apple tree, which the new horse fencing put into their territory, so they reap the fruit. If you want just a tree, buy cheap. If you want fruit, spend the money bc you will keep it a long time.
     

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