what to plant together?

glamer85

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I have a bunch of plants started. but I'm having a hard time deciding what to plant near each other and what to keep separate. I have green Beans, Onions, Potatoes, Tomatoes, Zucchini, Watermelon, Yellow Squash, Jalapeno, Banana Peppers, Cucumbers, Egg Plant, Cantaloupe, Corn (planted by its self), Bell pepper I think that's it. Just trying to figure out what order to plant things in.
 

Dace

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I suggest that you do a little research about companion planting. There are some plants that will actually stunt growth when planted together.

Here is a link, but there are many more on the web

http://www.ghorganics.com/page2.html
 

patandchickens

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You can get all mental about companion planting if you want, there are plenty of books and websites. Some of it does a little bit of good, but a lot of it is rather tenuous at best IMO.

A strictly pragmatic not-companion-planting-related approach would be something like this:

Plant the corn in a squareish block where it will recieve the least wind (b/c you don't want it to blow over) and somewhere along the N side of the garden if possible (so it doesn't shade shorter things too badly)

Plant the rampantly vining things (most especially your watermelons, but also cantaloupe, zucchini and squash) near the edges of the garden and/or in other places where if (when!) they exceed their planned space they will not be fatally overwhelming something smaller or valuable. Letting them lop over onto lawn is fine; letting them lop over onto space previously occupied by peas or some other early-harvested crop is fine; letting them submerge small-statured pepper plants, not so fine :)

If your beans are pole beans, plant them somewhere a bit sheltered from the worst storm winds if possible, also where they won't be shading other things too badly if it will be an extensive tall trellis system. (Teepees or a small trellis are not an issue)

If you want to save seeds, plant different pepper varieties as far apart as possible; also if your banana pepper is a hot variety and you don't like surprise-hot green pepper seeds, plant it as far away as possible.

If you are planning on doing a fairly strict rotation of crops in future years, it is good to think that through NOW, so you don't discover that every part of the garden has something from the Solenaceae ('maters, taters, peppers, eggplant) and they are thus unrotatable next year :p If you are not planning on losing sleep over rotation until/unless a problem develops, then don't worry about it.

Beyond that, do whatever floats your boat :)

Good luck, have fun,

Pat
 

Dace

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patandchickens said:
You can get all mental about companion planting if you want, there are plenty of books and websites. Some of it does a little bit of good, but a lot of it is rather tenuous at best
I have had good luck with companion planting and enjoyed learning about what grows well together and what doesn't.

The title of this thread is 'what to plant together'
 

sparks

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This year I am planting Tansy by all of my vining crops. Can`t think of where I read it but it is worth a try. I read something, write it down and forget where it came from.Books and magazines all over the house. Too bad it is time to be outside! Too bad it is snowing!!!!:/
 

vfem

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I find only about 50% of the companion planting options out there hold real truth. Most of them 'sound' good in theory but I have learned this because I really do ENJOY companion planting.

Do NOT plant tomatoes and carrots together. Your tomatoes will eventually shade the carrots and steal nutrients they need... taking the carrots forever until they are worth harvesting, and you end up taking up too much of you space for an extended amount of time.

I DO however suggest planting onions and garlic in the fall in beds you planted beds in over the summer. I've tested this theory and found the biggest onions and garlic heads were in those beds rather then others. But the fun part is, in spring, when the onions and garlic have a little ways to go, I plant lettuce & spinach in between the onions shoots. Loose leave salad lettuces work the best. After everything is harvested (mid May to early June here) I put in black beans or green beans.

These were just TESTS of course.... going to keep trying things as I wish to, but marking things off as a 'fail' if for ANY reason they don't work for my needs. So keep that in mind... it may be suggested to you to work, doesn't mean it will work for you so you don't HAVE to do it! :)
 

Kassaundra

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There is a native american way of planting called 3 sisters, companion planting corn, squash and beans. The corn provides natural trellis for the beans, and the squash act as living mulch for the corn. I haven't tried it yet, I am going to this year.

I have also read carrots and onions together confuse some carrot pests (stong smell of onion)

And you should not plant tomatoes and potatoes together ( I think it was about pest insects liking both and attracting more of them)

I have been doing research in companion planting, but this is my first year to put it into practice. So all my suggestions are from a book, not my own experience.
 

Rozzie

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Toss a few marigold seeds around other things. Supposedly it helps with insects. I like marigolds and am not willing to take a year of NOT planting them to test whether or not the insects are worse.
 

glamer85

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what about cross pollination? If i plant two types of watermelon near each other will i get mixed watermelon? or if i plant cucumber near cantaloupe will i get cuculoupe? ect......
 

lesa

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The only time cross pollination is an issue, is if you wish to save seeds. The fruit itself will not be affected...
 
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