Would like to buy Genetically Modified Seeds for Vegetables

Ariel301

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zuks77 said:
Appreciate your replies! :)


The problem that I have experienced is that over last couple of years my crops are getting smaller, takes much more energy + resources to grow same quality & quantity vegetables and little changes in weather (and over past 5 years the weather has become way too unpredictable & extreme in some cases) can easily affect and devastate seeds that are planted in open fields vs closed facilities that provide good shield.

Do you know of any other "magic" seeds that will give me bigger, jucier and tasting vegetables? (without adding chemicals, etc - I don't use and discourage everyone from using any chemicals to grow bigger crops...)
This sounds more like a problem with the soil than the crops. Rather than continue trashing the soil and just find a plant that can take the abuse, why not focus on rebuilding your soil so that it has nutrients for things to grow? The land is not meant to grow the same crop year after year after year for many years...practices like crop rotation and letting the field rest once every seven years will help you to have a better yield. Soil can only take so much before it needs a break, and chemical man-made fertilizer is never as balanced or as useful as natural organic-matter fertilizers.

As far as chemicals go...GMO crops are DESIGNED to be used with chemicals like pesticides and herbicides. The point of most of them is that they are resistant to the chemicals that are sprayed on the field, the chemicals will kill everything except the GMO crop. So if you're wanting to go chemical free, GMO isn't going to do anything for you. It does often produce a bigger product, but you pay for the size gain in a loss of flavor and nutrition and also poor health caused by consumption of that product. Laboratory testing on animals has shown that consumption of GMO feed products can contribute to reproductive failures, cancer, and all sorts of bad stuff in animals, so why do we think it doesn't do the same in humans? By growing plants on depleted soil with man-made chemical fertilizer, you also lose out on taste and nutrition, this is the problem today in America with commercially produced fruits and vegetables--it takes more and more chemicals every year to get them to grow because the soil is tired and out of nutrients. Just like people, plants need proper nutrition to grow right. So we formulate something in the laboratory, spray them, and we get HUGE produce that has no flavor and is not as nutritious as it used to be...if we ate right and produced our crops right, we wouldn't NEED to all be taking so many pills and vitamins every day...With produce, what you feed the crop is what will be put out in the fruit, so if you want delicious and healthy vegetables and fruits, you have to feed them the right stuff.

I would encourage you to have your soil tested to see what nutrients it is lacking in. Build it back up, and look for some "tried-and-true" commercial-type or hybrid tomatoes, I know "Early Girl" "Better Boy" and "Celebrity" all perform well for commercial growers in the United States. All are a medium sized typical red tomato. I don't find any of them to be especially flavorful when compared to the slower growing heirloom types though. The big downside to them is that you will have to buy seed every year if you use hybrids, as they do not breed true--saving seed from a hybrid tomato will not ensure that you have the same tomato in the next generation, you will end up with several types that may or may not be as good...it's like when you breed one mutt dog to another mutt dog and none of the puppies look like each other or either parent... But buying seed every year may not be a problem to you like it is to some people.
 

Hattie the Hen

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zuks77 said:
Appreciate your replies! :)
The problem that I have experienced is that over last couple of years my crops are getting smaller, takes much more energy + resources to grow same quality & quantity vegetables and little changes in weather (and over past 5 years the weather has become way too unpredictable & extreme in some cases) can easily affect and devastate seeds that are planted in open fields vs closed facilities that provide good shield.
I too think your soil is depleted & you really need to deal with this first. A lot of people around the world have been looking into the use of 'Rockdust' to re-mineralize their tired soils. Have a look at this link..........>>

http://www.seercentre.org.uk/

***'Rockdust' is just the UK trade-name for this volcanic rock product and it can be found in many other countries under other names. It has been found to have remarkable properties & effects. It is worth reading up & following through peoples' experiences with it. I myself used it last year on some very sad soil & had very good results.

On a lighter note (well, maybe NOT...... :ep ) I think you should read these lyrics as they sum up how a lot of us feel about large AG companies who peddle GM seeds & harmful pesticides as well as virtually enslave small farmers with their ever increasing prices & demands.

***Incidentally I got these lyrics off a GM Watch Twitter site

http://twitter.com/GMWatch



:bee Hattie :bee
 

seedcorn

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GMO crops are DESIGNED to be used with chemicals like pesticides and herbicides
This is so wrong, it's not worth the effort.

Zuk, again, don't let people scare you off. Ask away.
 

vfem

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seedcorn said:
GMO crops are DESIGNED to be used with chemicals like pesticides and herbicides
This is so wrong, it's not worth the effort.

Zuk, again, don't let people scare you off. Ask away.
If you read the whole paragraph seed, it is true. GMO are designed to be resist to the weed killers. So you get to SPRAY AWAY and the chemicals won't kill your crops.

I knew you didn't read half of what you scream LIES about.

Perhaps she could have used better wording for what she was explaining... but she's correct. Many GMO crops are RESISTANT to ROUND-UP and are designed to stand up to the farms constant spraying.
 

wifezilla

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The ability to withstand spraying of insecticides and pesticides is a selling point of GM crops.

What could possibly go wrong???

"Genetically modified cotton stops one bug but fosters others
A Chinese crop designed to thrive without pesticides needs them again.
May 16, 2010|By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times

The widespread planting of a genetically engineered crop designed to withstand a menacing pest has had the unanticipated consequence of transforming benign bugs into agricultural predators, according to a new study.

In findings that drive home the difficulty of trying to stay one step ahead of nature, scientists explain how farmers of bioengineered cotton in northern China were able to drastically reduce their insecticide use for more than a decade, only to find themselves spraying a crop that wasn't supposed to need such measures.

The genetically engineered plants were designed to withstand attacks from the cotton bollworm by growing their own pesticide a deadly toxin that was originally discovered in a soil bacterium called Bacillus thuringiensis, or Bt. Splicing the Bt genes into the cotton plants' DNA has kept the bollworm at bay.

Opponents of genetically engineered crops had warned that insects like the bollworm would inevitably breed resistance to the Bt toxin. So far, that hasn't happened. Instead, the crops effectively created a new category of pests called mirid bugs.

Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and the National Agro-Technical Extension and Service Center in Beijing documented that as adoption of Bt cotton rose and pesticide use declined mirid bugs did more damage to cotton crops. What's more, the growing population of hungry critters also devoured crops of Chinese dates, grapes, apples, peaches and pears.

In essence, the introduction of genetically engineered cotton transformed the fields into a habitat that enabled mirid bugs to thrive and spread, the researchers reported Thursday in the journal Science.

Researchers from Cornell University in Ithaca, N.Y., first noticed the problem in 2004, when they surveyed 481 farmers in five Chinese provinces. They suspected something was amiss when they discovered that Bt cotton farmers were using more pesticides than farmers planting conventional cotton.

"That made no sense to us," said Per Pinstrup-Andersen, a professor of food, nutrition and public policy at Cornell who oversaw the survey. Then they realized that mirid bugs had emerged as secondary pests.

"They had had a field day because farmers were using very little pesticide, since they didn't have to spray for the bollworm," said Pinstrup-Andersen, who published his findings with colleagues. "Over time, the farmers had to go in and use pesticide again."
http://articles.latimes.com/2010/may/16/science/la-sci-cotton-bugs-20100516
 

lesa

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Why does man think they can outsmart mother nature??? Very interesting article, wife....
 

seedcorn

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wifezilla

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GMO crops are designed to work with a specific spray. Some are engineered to make their own pesticides or herbcides. You can pretend all you want they don't, but the whole point of the genetic modification was to make crops "Round Up Ready".

"Monsanto developed and patented the glyphosate molecule in the 1970s, and marketed Roundup from 1973. It retained exclusive rights in the US until its US patent expired in September, 2000, and maintained a predominant marketshare in countries where the patent expired earlier. Pesticides based on these poisonous chemicals, including Roundup have been banned in various countries due to their toxic effects on humans and wildlife.

The main active ingredient of Roundup is the isopropylamine salt of glyphosate. Another important ingredient of Roundup is the surfactant POEA (polyethoxylated tallow amine), which is known for its toxicity in wildlife.[6] It increases herbicide penetration in plant[7] and animal[8][9] cells.

Several weed species, known as superweeds, have developed Roundup resistance largely because of repeated exposure.[10]

Monsanto also produces seeds which grow into plants genetically engineered to be tolerant to glyphosate, which are known as Roundup Ready crops. The genes contained in these seeds are patented. Such crops allow farmers to use glyphosate as a post-emergence herbicide against most broadleaf and cereal weeds. Soy was the first Roundup Ready crop, and was produced at Monsanto's Agracetus Campus located in Middleton, Wisconsin."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roundup_(herbicide)

Not sure where the debate on this is. My opinion that this is a bad thing and your opinion that this is a good thing have nothing to do with the facts that GMO crops are designed to work with a specific chemical. You spray the chemical and it kills the weeds or bugs but not the GMO crop. While this was supposed to REDUCE the amount and number of pesticides used on crops overall by reducing the need to one, it isn't working out that way.

Also my opinion, work on soil and get it healthy and avoid GMO seeds like the plague. It's not worth the super weeds and super bugs you may accidentally create.
 

Collector

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How did I know How this was going to turn out!
HEY V thought you were going to stay out of it LMAO.
I knew you couldnt.

To the OP, I think you will do yourself a favor By just using Hybred seeds,if You just want to increase you yeild per Acre. Going down the gmo road is not all its cracked up to be. However you are free to do what you want, I would suggest you might want to investigate Pros and cons a bit more.
Good discussion though.
 

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Edited for content

From the rules:

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