A Favorite Tea?

PunkinPeep

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digitS' said:
Well, you remember those potatoes, eggs, and those 2 cartons of sour cream? We are now down to 1 carton of sour cream . . .

In the "ingredient search" - I included those 3 ingredients and tossed in half a carton of ricotta cheese.

Out popped a potato timbale!

I used to make clam timbales with rice and a nice sauce. Apparently, they were something special. My brother still talks about them and, believe me, my brother doesn't talk about much. We are very different people . . .

Steve
wow! sounds yummy! and rich!
 

Rosalind

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Lemon verbena, Aloysia triphylla. No question. They are deciduous even in warm climates, and mine lose all their leaves after I bring em indoors. I have to water sticks for five months out of the year. No matter. They are totally worth it. If not made into tea, then simmered in milk that is then used for custards. My cats say, they think the hibiscus is the tastiest thing ever, so I haven't had any hibiscus teas in about a year. :/

For caffeinated tea, one of my friends at work recently gave me a tin of "kung fu tea" from China--apparently little old ladies will use one small packet, about a tablespoon, of this tea to make seven, yes, seven pots of tea, which they sit around drinking in the town square as they play Mahjong and yell at passers-by. It's a type of whole-leaf gunpowder type green tea, and it is called kung fu tea because it has so much caffeine and because it makes seven cups--each leaf packs a punch, as it were.

In a little fit of pique once I said to a waitress "Are you going to bring the grounds out for those coffee drinkers so they can use them over again, too?"
:lol: I've had some restaurant coffee where I suspected that was the case. :sick
 

digitS'

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My lemon verbena is on the floor of the greenhouse covered with 2 plastic tablecloths. It was under a quilt last year and I may need that again.

It came out to get a breath of fresh air since the greenhouse warmed to nearly 60F today . . . even tho' the thermometer only made it up to 16 despite a day of sunshine.

Sticks, yes that's all it is, Rosalind, but the rosemary looks pretty good out there :).

Steve
 

cwhit590

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hmm.....favorite tea.....

I'm no tea connoisseur....but I would have to say peppermint tea is my fav. It's great in the evening after a big meal.

The past few years I've been taking herbal teas from Traditional Medicinals when I start getting a cold, etc. They seem to help my immune system bounce back faster.

When I do drink tea, I drink it at night. It's relaxing...and it always makes me.......very...........sleepy................:th
 

digitS'

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Seems like I remember their "Throat Coat" as being of pleasant help, CWhit.

I had a cold in October but it was the first in several years. Often, I have either sucked on slices of licorice root or made an infusion out of them to take the discomfort out of the throat.

Ginger also helps used the same ways . . . and it helps me to rub the cut ginger on my throat and forehead . . . probably, should rub it all over myself :rolleyes:.

As I say, I don't get colds very often anymore. They may avoid me . . .

Steve
 

cwhit590

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Yup, you are correct Steve....I was taking a lot of the Throat Coat a few weeks back due to a persistant cough/cold/respiratory issues. It helps, but the flavor isn't my fav. I think it's the slippery elm or licorice root....? This time I got the Lemon Echinacea Throat Coat and I like that flavor a little better.

I enjoy the flavor of their blends that contain Echinacea and Elderberry...like the 'Gypsy Cold Care' and 'Echinacea Immune Support' (I think that's what it's called).....very pleasant flavor, even without honey (I usually drink my tea plain).
 

digitS'

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I had forgotten about "Gypsy Cold Care," Caleb. Yes, that was of help.

Punkin, I believe I should recommend anise hyssop, aka. licorice mint (Agastache foeniculum). I grew the plants 10 years ago and then found reference to its safety in a UK herb book. So, I gave all those plants away - they are quite ornamental.

After 7 or 8 years casual research, I came to the conclusion that no other source was questioning the safety of this plant. It seems to me that the concern was with licorice, itself. Licorice acts as blood thinner, apparently, not licorice mint, an entirely different plant.

By itself, and especially in combination with lemon verbena, licorice mint is a favorite. And importantly, I can grow it!! Whether it will grow well in eastern Texas :hu, but I suspect so.

Don't allow it to reach the stage when the swallowtails show up before harvesting some for tea. The seed seems to germinate so easily, you should have plenty of extra plants for the swallowtails. And be advised if you do grow it, it self-sows vigorously.

Steve
4989_anise_hyssop.jpg
 

Reinbeau

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Yes it does self-sow vigorously, but I love it, and so do the honeybees, as well as all the other pollinators. It's a great plant to have as a 'weed' ;)
 

PunkinPeep

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That anise hyssop sounds great. Sadly, for me, it appears to be a lover of cold. The USDA distribution shows it stopping several states north of me, which makes me think it doesn't dig our heat. :D

Last year, i did have one anise plant - i have no idea which variety (back then i was even less knowledgeable than i am now) - but we had some destructive dogs who have since found a more suitable home - anyway, they dug up almost everything i planted. And the anise died.

I will try again though. The smell is to die for.
 

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