Another suspicious one

Pulsegleaner

Garden Addicted
Joined
Apr 18, 2014
Messages
2,198
Reaction score
3,139
Points
266
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, New York

Ridgerunner

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
8,102
Reaction score
9,521
Points
397
Location
Southeast Louisiana Zone 9A
I took this from the link. The way I read this is that they don't have the licenses to export them to the US. Order at your own risk.

-It is the buyer’s responsibility to know their countries customs laws, seeds may be restricted from importing to your country. Please check with your customs agency and/ or post office before purchasing. Upon purchasing this item Buyer accepts the risk of item being confiscated and/or destroyed by customs and Seller will not be held liable for this.
 

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
12,021
Reaction score
14,421
Points
357
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
I took this from the link. The way I read this is that they don't have the licenses to export them to the US. Order at your own risk.

-It is the buyer’s responsibility to know their countries customs laws, seeds may be restricted from importing to your country. Please check with your customs agency and/ or post office before purchasing. Upon purchasing this item Buyer accepts the risk of item being confiscated and/or destroyed by customs and Seller will not be held liable for this.

you can pretty much assume that any citrus is going to be a problem for states that grow citrus. i mean even travelling by car they often don't want people moving citrus plants around (and i don't blame them one bit). since @Pulsegleaner is in a northern state without a citrus industry they might not have as much of an issue, but i'd still want to check that out to be sure before even attempting it.
 

Marie2020

Deeply Rooted
Joined
May 21, 2020
Messages
1,883
Reaction score
3,331
Points
175
you can pretty much assume that any citrus is going to be a problem for states that grow citrus. i mean even travelling by car they often don't want people moving citrus plants around (and i don't blame them one bit). since @Pulsegleaner is in a northern state without a citrus industry they might not have as much of an issue, but i'd still want to check that out to be sure before even attempting it.
I've managed too get a tiny little lemon tree too grow from a pip. I hope it survives
20220120_211430.jpg
 

Pulsegleaner

Garden Addicted
Joined
Apr 18, 2014
Messages
2,198
Reaction score
3,139
Points
266
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, New York
It should. Once a citrus tree gets that big, it tends to be pretty hardy. And most citruses will be perfectly content to live (and flower and fruit) in a large pot.

Actually, if that is a lemon, you can do me a favor. Rub one of the leaves and then smell your fingers. Do they smell like lemon or do they have the more general citrus leaf smell? (I can't really describe that, except that it smells "clean") I had a lemon tree once whose leaves smelled of lemons, and I never found out if that is normal or not.

As of now, I have a whole POT of Yuzu treelets, three or four of some sort of Japanese mandarin orange that begins with an "M" (can't remember more, and haven't seen it the last few years, but it tasted like a Dekapon/Sumo mandarin) And once sudachi tree that I bought AS a tree.

Besides the above citrus, I was looking at someone in Sri Lanka who looks like they have the RIGHT strain of Calamansi (I can get calamansi trees in Chinatown no problem when I can go back there, but they are the kind with the tiny orange skinned fruit. I'm looking for the kind with the orange flesh and green skin, the kind they actually use in drinks.) But if citrus from Canada might be a problem, citrus from Sri Lanka will CERTAINATLY be.

I also keep my eye peeled for any seeds that show up in regular Persian/Tahitian limes, as those are rare and unpredictable (as the modern lime is triploid, and rarely makes seeds.)

And I missed out on my chance to get trees growing of the Minkan mandarin orange (the one that they use for canned mandarin orange slices.) and the Mango orange (I hate the things, but they are so unusual I should have made some trees for others.)
 

Marie2020

Deeply Rooted
Joined
May 21, 2020
Messages
1,883
Reaction score
3,331
Points
175
It should. Once a citrus tree gets that big, it tends to be pretty hardy. And most citruses will be perfectly content to live (and flower and fruit) in a large pot.

Actually, if that is a lemon, you can do me a favor. Rub one of the leaves and then smell your fingers. Do they smell like lemon or do they have the more general citrus leaf smell? (I can't really describe that, except that it smells "clean") I had a lemon tree once whose leaves smelled of lemons, and I never found out if that is normal or not.

As of now, I have a whole POT of Yuzu treelets, three or four of some sort of Japanese mandarin orange that begins with an "M" (can't remember more, and haven't seen it the last few years, but it tasted like a Dekapon/Sumo mandarin) And once sudachi tree that I bought AS a tree.

Besides the above citrus, I was looking at someone in Sri Lanka who looks like they have the RIGHT strain of Calamansi (I can get calamansi trees in Chinatown no problem when I can go back there, but they are the kind with the tiny orange skinned fruit. I'm looking for the kind with the orange flesh and green skin, the kind they actually use in drinks.) But if citrus from Canada might be a problem, citrus from Sri Lanka will CERTAINATLY be.

I also keep my eye peeled for any seeds that show up in regular Persian/Tahitian limes, as those are rare and unpredictable (as the modern lime is triploid, and rarely makes seeds.)

And I missed out on my chance to get trees growing of the Minkan mandarin orange (the one that they use for canned mandarin orange slices.) and the Mango orange (I hate the things, but they are so unusual I should have made some trees for others.)
Thanks for your reply :)

No, there's no smell from the leaf. I'm really surprised because at the same time I tried too grow a sweet small orange pip which I thought would come too nothing.

So it's not the lemon I'd hoped and I doubt very much if any fruit will come from these tiny orange pips because I'm in UK

This is the second one that is struggling too grow. I've watered them with a little lemon juice now and then
I have been thinking of planting them into the same pot

20220120_220530.jpg
 

Pulsegleaner

Garden Addicted
Joined
Apr 18, 2014
Messages
2,198
Reaction score
3,139
Points
266
Location
Lower Hudson Valley, New York
Hmm, I've never heard of watering with lemon juice. I would think that would acidify the soil a lot and hurt the plant.

But I wouldn't worry overmuch about the orange not producing fruit. As I said, most citruses are comfortable growing in pots. In the UK you'll never get to plant the tree OUTSIDE (anymore than I can here in New York) But in a 10 gallon pot on the floor, it should get big enough to make some fruit.

Incidentally, if you can get your hands on a Yuzu (or a Kabosu or a Sudachi) they CAN be grown outside in the UK (and here) Since they all have part of their ancestry in a citrus called the papeda, they are quite cold hardy, and can take temperatures down to about -10--15 Celsius. HOW to get any of these fruits in the UK I don't know (the two best ideas I could come up with would be to find a large Japanese grocery store or go to London and check the fruit section of the Food Halls at Harrods, since they seem to carry EVERY fruit.). There are a couple of other such citruses, like the Ichang.
 

Latest posts

Top