Baymule’s 2020 Garden

Marie2020

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when we harvest and cure the squash we normally do triage where any that are blemished or showing some signs of fungi will get cut apart and baked, then eaten or baked and then scooped out and frozen. letting them go longer just invites more damage and loss for those that are already injured.

since we don't have magic eyes that can see what is going on inside we can't always tell if a squash is ready, spoiling or not fully developed until we actually cut it open. if the squash has been out in the sun for a while and the stem is dry then it's done well enough for eating. after a few more weeks they might improve, by mid-winter it can be chancy but when you get a good one they're very appreciated.

the one year we had five wheelbarrows of squash to cope with i froze gallon bags with them flattened so they would stack in the freezer and we sure enjoyed them for the next year or so, but it was a lot of work in the early fall to get all those squash that needed to be dealt with right away taken care of when i was needing to do other things.

i'm hoping the next few days we can get the squash harvested here too, they'll need to be hosed off from all the mud/sand splashed on them but they look ok at the first glance now.

it rained enough here last night that all the gardens are wet and muddy so i'll let them be for the day of sunshine and breezes to dry out and then take stock tomorrow. i got piles of beans that need shelling. :)
I love squash and pumpkin. Hopefully I can start with a pumkin soon
 

baymule

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I had a neighbor come over yesterday to buy some lamb. He asked what was ready in the garden and was shocked when I replied that the garden is pretty much done. I had to explain that winter frosts and freezes turns whatever is growing to mush. For a "city" man that is accustomed to buying "fresh" at the grocery store when ever he wants, it was an educational eye opener. It was amusing to me and I thought I'd share a laugh with y'all.
 

Carol Dee

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I had a neighbor come over yesterday to buy some lamb. He asked what was ready in the garden and was shocked when I replied that the garden is pretty much done. I had to explain that winter frosts and freezes turns whatever is growing to mush. For a "city" man that is accustomed to buying "fresh" at the grocery store when ever he wants, it was an educational eye opener. It was amusing to me and I thought I'd share a laugh with y'all.
WOW, did not think about that! But it reminds me of my oldest when he was 2 (almost 3) We where looking at animal photos. I asked him what animal the Cow was, he was stumped! So I asked, where does milk come from.... The Grocery Store, he says ;) LOL
 

baymule

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People have no idea where food comes from or what it takes to produce it. This neighbor loves lamb and I had to break the news to him that I will be taking the 2021 lamb crop to auction instead of slaughter. I explained to him that with the Covid panic, everyone wants to raise their own meat and the slaughter places are all booked out over a year in advance. I recently put the ram in with the ewes, it is a 5 month gestation, slaughter at 6-10 months old, how to set a slaughter date for lambs not even conceived yet? :barnie He was dumbfounded. Food is supposed to instantly appear on demand. Poor city dummy.
 

digitS'

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Well, my first thought was about those folks who think that winter squash is grown in the winter.

As kids, I remember that we also had some fun with the name "squash."

One can imagine that Bay' is now thought of as a neighborhood Wise Woman, in his household.

Steve
 

Carol Dee

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People have no idea where food comes from or what it takes to produce it. This neighbor loves lamb and I had to break the news to him that I will be taking the 2021 lamb crop to auction instead of slaughter. I explained to him that with the Covid panic, everyone wants to raise their own meat and the slaughter places are all booked out over a year in advance. I recently put the ram in with the ewes, it is a 5 month gestation, slaughter at 6-10 months old, how to set a slaughter date for lambs not even conceived yet? :barnie He was dumbfounded. Food is supposed to instantly appear on demand. Poor city dummy.
YEP, with prices low on surplus hogs, we went in with several people and butchered. It was really hard to find a place to process what we wanted. Just the bacon and ham primarily. The other cuts and grinding we did.
 

Zeedman

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It’s my second corn crop. First one was Painted Mountain corn and I didn’t want them to cross pollinate.
I've been considering growing Painted Mountain, to make my own corn meal. It may tassel fast enough here to beat the local field corn, which would allow me to save seed without bagging. I'd be very interested to hear your assessment of that variety.
 

baymule

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I've been considering growing Painted Mountain, to make my own corn meal. It may tassel fast enough here to beat the local field corn, which would allow me to save seed without bagging. I'd be very interested to hear your assessment of that variety.
It tassels in 40 days. The cornmeal is delicious and we love the cornbread. It is a fast growing corn. PM your address to me and I will send you seed! @thistlebloom And exchanged seed to mix up our genetics. I have first year cross, labeled Texas and Idaho. Another year or two should mix it up good. I’ll be glad to share!
 

baymule

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YEP, with prices low on surplus hogs, we went in with several people and butchered. It was really hard to find a place to process what we wanted. Just the bacon and ham primarily. The other cuts and grinding we did.
No surplus hogs here!! Feeder pigs have shot to the moon at $100-$250 per little pig!! It’s crazy! We got lucky, buying ours first of February and booking a slaughter date, before everyone went Covid Crazy.
 

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