Coffee

ducks4you

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Good morning! Coffee is all gone, make your own! 😀😀
33F with high of 55F. Kinda cold outside.
Gosh @baymule! Like I would drive to your house and demand this!!
Family said this morning was the first time any of them had a good cup of coffee since they went on their trip. Cruise coffee sucks worse than the last time I went on a cruise and DD said even Starbucks sucked pretty bad.
I have had a good cup of coffee from Pilot stations, but they fill their machines with beans and grind and brew immediately.
I had yellow cake with chocolate frosting with MY coffee.
I would make more coffee for you, baymule....any time.
 

Country Homesteader

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Branching Out

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Pansies don't actually "come back", they're annuals. What they do do is drop seed that can germinate and make a new batch.
I planted pansies last spring and then over-wintered them, and they did drop a LOT
of seed. There must be a thousand 1/2" tall seedlings sprouting. The original 'mother' plants made it through the winter too, because here in the Pacific Northwest pansies are very hardy. They go dormant during the winter, and then take off growing again come spring. Out of curiosity I tried looking up pansies and some say they are 'short-lived perennials', with one site saying they are biennials. In our zone they definitely grow like biennials in that they are sown in summer, they over-winter, and then they set seed the following year. Whatever they are, most people certainly treat them as annuals.
 

Phaedra

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I planted pansies last spring and then over-wintered them, and they did drop a LOT
of seed. There must be a thousand 1/2" tall seedlings sprouting. The original 'mother' plants made it through the winter too, because here in the Pacific Northwest pansies are very hardy. They go dormant during the winter, and then take off growing again come spring. Out of curiosity I tried looking up pansies and some say they are 'short-lived perennials', with one site saying they are biennials. In our zone they definitely grow like biennials in that they are sown in summer, they over-winter, and then they set seed the following year. Whatever they are, most people certainly treat them as annuals.
Same here; besides those self-seeded ones, I also got one specific plant that successfully overwintered outside. That's amazing. I carefully checked it and am sure that the new shoots are from the original plant that I plugged in last summer.

3781.jpg
 

digitS'

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Good Morning. I will have to snap a picture of the "pansy flat" of seedlings for 2023. Some will go along one side of the driveway in a very narrow bed and too much shade from the neighbor's fence and the pickup parked there.

I'm up a little late - thankfully. Freezing outside so the house cooled and I tolerated that Winter comforter on the bed better than yesterday.

I checked the visitor list on TEG and see @Carol Dee already there obviously looking to see what member may be having a birthday. Isn't she nice?

Steve :)
 
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