Cold stratisfying blueberries

valley ranch

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It takes a couple years to fruit, of course you can graft, but still takes a while before your bushes have stems the size of your finger that makes it easer to graft, in a greenhouse situation it easier, unless you live in a warm state, I'm planning to start some bushes here at daughters place, get the seeds from my breakfast Blueberries, I've recently become fond of blueberries and Banana with Rolled Oat, and Almond milk,,,

I hope you keep us updated on your plants, unless you've already know where and how you plan to start your seeds, if I may suggest: Something as simple as a plastic cake box that a bakery would, or store , you'll be able to control the moisture,well in a southern facing window, don't know the conditions where you live, when they are ready to put in separate all pots and supposed to grow straight, I'd still have a plastic or bottle over them and allow only morning and afternoon sun, gosh you might know a better way, please show your progress, I will as well if if I actually do plant instead of dreaming, excuse me if I've said too much I tend to do that 😊 Good luck I'll be watching and cheering for you 👍
That word is "support " so they grow up and somewhat straight,,,

I'm on a phone. So I haven't much control of my typing,,,
 

P Suckling

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I woul
What I usually do is put the pack of seeds in my freezer, right where I will see it. You could then mark your calendar for 3 months from now, and take them out and sow them in mid-May. Cold stratifying makes the seed think that they have gone through winter, and then when you plant them they will think it is spring!
I would like to cold stratify my oleagnus. Tried last year with pots outside over winter, but no germination. The rest of the seeds are still in the freezer. Are these seeds now already enabled by their freezer slumber? Should I sow them in warmth now? Or try again with pots in the cold. We just about have time for another 3 month seeded in a pot outside with sometime at least a little frost at night, before mid May. But I am unwilling to just repeat, what did not work last year and expect a better outcome. Any suggestions please what to try next?
 

Branching Out

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I would like to cold stratify my oleagnus.
Some seeds do just fine germinating after being placed in the freezer for a while. Snapdragons and other hardy annual flowers like Dianthus fall in to this catagory. Others need an even longer cold, moist treatment that allows the seed to experience a full season of winter, like Primroses. Hellebores and peonies are even trickier; they seem to need a period of warmth (summer) followed by cold (winter) in order to germinate reliably.

I am not familiar with oleagnus, and am unsure of its requirements for germination. Is this the plant that you are wishing to cold stratify, a Russian Olive? If so, it looks like soaking the seeds for 6 hours and then cold stratifying them outdoors for several months may indeed do the trick. Your garden is in Germany if I remember correctly, which has a climate that is fairly similar to where I live. My preferred method of cold stratification is to 'Winter Sow' seeds in a milk jug that is left outdoors, because the milk jug keeps the seeds moist so they can germinate when they feel they are ready. Seeds that require cold stratification often benefit from the changing temperatures of warmer days and cooler nights too-- unlike other seeds that like the temperature to be constant both day and night for optimal germination. Another benefit of using milk jugs is that once up, the sprouts are protected from animals and sheltered from extreme weather too. The only thing I have to be careful with is to not sow the seeds too thickly, because often times all of the seeds seem to germinate. Given that you have had the seeds in the freezer they are likely well-positioned to be winter sown in this fashion. https://sheffields.com/seeds/Elaeagnus/angustifolia
 
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P Suckling

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Thank you very much, will try that. A covered container is needed, I had an open one last year. Yes it is autumn olive, the tiny red quite sharp fruits. Could not take our bushes to Germany, but the seeds and would like to grow some here from the fruit that did so well in England.
 
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