cracked fingertips

Phaedra Geiermann

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I second trying to find O'Keefe's Working Hands or a similar product if it’s not available. If there’s nothing like that available try getting some very strong lotion and putting a large amount on and then putting on medical gloves and leaving them in there for a while. Basically soaking your hands in the lotion. Sort of like you would a hair treatment. Part of the problem is probably that you are rubbing the lotion off those areas before it gets a chance to soak in good.
You are right!! I didn't give fingertips enought time to absorb anything.
And this also reminds me a product I bought recently - a tap descaler.

I should soak my fingertips into some lotion as a weekly (at least) ritual, they work too hard.
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And
 

Phaedra Geiermann

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Actually, cracked fingertips was a complaint on a private low-fat vegan forum I belonged to for a time. The program was meant to have less than 10% of diet be in the form of fat, but some people (including moderators) began to strive for 0% fat. One of the results was extremely painful cracks forming on fingertips.
0% fat! I can't even imagine that. I am more from the side of low carb. :p
 

Phaedra Geiermann

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I've been told that my grandfather (a farmer) used a mixture of lanolin and glycerin for chapped hands.

Sometimes preparations made for foot care are more effective than hand creams for healing cracked skin.
My feet had crack problems in the past, too, until I forced myself to apply lotion on them almost every night.

What @Artichoke Lover reminded me above is so true, it's easier for skins to absorb but a lot more difficult for the small corners like fingertips. So soaking them in a bit of foot lotion can be a solution for intense care. :D

Also as @Ridgerunner said, I never need to worry about such issues before moving to Germany. The low humidity here has really both advantages and drawbacks.
 

Rhodie Ranch

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Make sure your hands/fingertips are well hydrated, then lightly dry, and apply heavy cream. You can also sand off the rough edges of the cracks, exposing new skin.

I have very very oily skin, like Ridge. I even went to a Derm last week due to the pimples, breakouts and such at 67 yrs old. But my heels and my hands are bone dry. I sand the heels, lather with Eucerin heavy duty lotion, then put my socks on. Always after a warm shower.
 

meadow

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+1 for Eucerin. It is one of the very few lotions that absorb into the skin rather than just sit on top.

At times I've tried slathering on different lotions for an overnight treatment, with gloves or socks. The test is in the morning! There are many that show no noticeable difference to the skin, and even seem to be a surface coating to be washed off when bathing.
 

Zeedman

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I think genetics has something to do with it too. My skin is naturally very oily. My wife was horrified when she learned that I wash my face with soap every day that I can. If I don't, even at my age I can wind up with blackheads and pimples, specially around the nose.
I agree. DW & I are complete opposites in skin complexion... my Northern ancestry has given me oily skin, her tropical ancestry has given her dry skin. She uses lotion often, but is especially susceptible to dry Winter air. She would be another +1 for Eucerin, which has worked well for her.

Gloves help when working in the garden. I use heavy gloves (leather or heavy cotton work gloves) to protect from getting blisters during hard labor, but had a difficult time finding gardening gloves I was happy with. All the leather gloves I tried either had poor dexterity, or were flexible but wore out. Thick rubber gloves (or rubber-coated gloves) make my hands sweat excessively, and can even restrict restrict movement. High-mil plastic gloves work for awhile (and DW likes them) but not very comfortable in direct sunlight. Cloth gloves, if reinforced, are good for awhile; but wear out quickly.

I had to wear cut-protective gloves on my last job (supplied by the company as PPE). They went through quite a few suppliers looking for the right gloves, were receptive to my & the other operators' feedback, and we eventually settled on rubber-coated knit cut gloves. The rubber coating would eventually wear down, but the underlying Kevlar was VERY durable. They were tight fitting but flexible, and well suited to tasks requiring dexterity. When the rubber grip had worn down too much to be used on the job, I took some home to use in the garden... they work great. Soil doesn't really cling to them, and they can be washed over & over. I don't have the exact part #, but they were similar to these: knit cut gloves
 

digitS'

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I have been disappointed by the use of one cream and thought of that this morning.

Frequently troubled by minor rashes, I discovered an itchy area on my chest when I tumbled outta bed to greet the day. No redness yet but I know how these progress. Hydrocortisone cream preferred but I have a prescription steroid cream if there isn't immediate relief for this urge to scatch.

Okay digitS', make sure that you put some of that on the split on your thumb. Why? You know steroids are suppose to help heal. Yeah right, after 5 days and by the time it would probably heal by itself. That antibiotic cream would likely be a better choice.

Maybe it's because I am so likely to wash it off too quickly. The steroid cream on the chest is good until my evening shower. Something really sticky is better for my thumb, like the O'keefe's. Maybe, I will put the antibiotic on first.

Steve
 

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