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Droopy Salvia...

Discussion in 'Flowers & Roses' started by Andrew, May 22, 2019.

  1. May 22, 2019
    Andrew

    Andrew Attractive To Bees

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    Hi everyone,

    I picked up a salvia (nemorosa "Snow Hill") the other day, and planted it the next, following directions to dig a larger hole, use soil conditioner, water, etc.

    That same evening it looked "droopy" - I thought it was the weight of the water; the stems were spreading like they did when it was heavy from watering, but didn't return to upright.

    Still like that two days later; otherwise, looks healthy.

    So... I have no clue what's going on - any help appreciated!

    thanks,
    Andrew
     
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  2. May 22, 2019
    baymule

    baymule Garden Master

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    I don't know what is going on either. But I had to laugh.....when I read the title the first time, I read Droopy SALIVA. First thought, how does he know my drooling dog? :lol::lol:
     
  3. May 23, 2019
    ninnymary

    ninnymary Garden Master

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    Sounds like it went into transplant shock.

    Mary
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2019
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  4. May 23, 2019
    ducks4you

    ducks4you Garden Master

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    You could dig it up and try again. You really need to amend the soil with compost (or aged manure, if you have it) and make it light and fluffy. You should be able to hand dig the soil before you plant. Check the dirt around it. It may have hardened up and you salvia is being strangled!!! THAT's an ugly sight! :sick
     
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  5. May 23, 2019
    Andrew

    Andrew Attractive To Bees

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    Thanks - I am able to hand-dig the mixture, but didn't add manure to the mix. I'll pull it out & re-plant.

    The soil is fairly compacted (before digging) but I can't really loosen up the whole area - the instructions said to dig a hole twice the diameter of the roots, so I followed those directions... (that said, the picture shows a hole three times as wide).

    Out of curiosity, what should I expect if left as-is? Not planning on it, just curious.

    cheers
     
  6. May 23, 2019
    ducks4you

    ducks4you Garden Master

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    Best to dig up as much bed as possible. I live on what Used to be a farm property. My first garden failed bc I was planting in straight clay. Never imagined That bc we have between 3-18inches of "topsoil" where I live in IL, north of where the glaciers stopped, but there it was, compacted clay. Since then I have been amending my beds. I moved to these 5 acres to have my horses in the back yard in 1999, and since then I also started to keep chickens. LOTS of manure and compost!! I don't have to buy it. If you do have to buy, buy aged cow manure and till it or hand work it into your beds WAAAAYYYYY beyond double the size of the hole for the plant. It wouldn't hurt if you dug everything up, amended the enTIRE bed, then replanted. The replanting will be easy peasy, the reworking of the bed is heavy labor, BUT, isn't that why we garden, to get a great workout and great eating?
     
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  7. May 24, 2019
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    This sounds about right.
    I would leave it be, no need to mess with the hole or replanting IMO.
    How does your soil drain? If it's holding water you could be drowning it.
    Too much water exhibits a lot like not enough with drooping plants.
    Salvias like it more on the dry side with a good draining soil.
     
  8. May 24, 2019
    Andrew

    Andrew Attractive To Bees

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    Hi Thistlebloom -

    I'm not sure about the drainage - there are only a few grasses and flowers there now, but they've done fine.

    Perhaps I should raise it up a bit? Had some heavy rain yesterday / last night... It's not looking too good :( salvia.JPG
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2019
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  9. May 24, 2019
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    Andrew, I don't think there is a problem. I see a plant that has just lodged a bit from being planted when mature and flowering. The leaves look good, not stressed at all. What you can do with salvias is give them a haircut when they are done blooming and they will regrow and often rebloom.

    Your Veronica and the grasses in the background look healthy btw.

    The way I do it is to gather the stems up in your hand like a ponytail and cut them off just a little below where the lowest bloom is.
    You don't have to wait for all the petals to fall off. It will look odd for a week or two before it pushes out new growth.
    I would not raise it. It's hard to see, but looks like it's already slightly above grade. It will be fine. :)
     
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  10. May 24, 2019
    ninnymary

    ninnymary Garden Master

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    I agree with Thistle. I didn't realize it was that matured. I also don't see leaves drooping. If that falling stem bothers you, you can either tie it back up or prune it.

    I'm curious, did you replant it? I wouldn't have. Salvias also take poor soil.

    Mary
     
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