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Fig Trees Made into Firewood

Discussion in 'Trees & Shrubs' started by Nyboy, Nov 8, 2016.

  1. Nov 8, 2016
    Nyboy

    Nyboy Garden Master

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    Don't Think I will be eating anymore figs
     
  2. Nov 8, 2016
    ninnymary

    ninnymary Garden Master

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    Just protein. I love my figs with bleu cheese. Have no problem eating them. lol Of course, I'll just double check to make sure nothing is moving. haha

    Mary
     
  3. Nov 8, 2016
    so lucky

    so lucky Garden Master

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    I wonder why she didn't see them before when she was eating them. Is that at a particular stage of development that people wouldn't ordinarily eat the fig? (like before it is ripe?)
    Anyway, I enjoyed her presentation. She seemed like a naturally gregarious person.
     
  4. Nov 8, 2016
    bobm

    bobm Garden Addicted

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    This is the way fig trees reproduce, so nothing new here. People have been eating figs for centuries without any issues or not wanting to eat the fruit of the fig tree due to extra protein. And so ... they are ORGANIC after all. ;)
     
  5. Nov 8, 2016
    waretrop

    waretrop Deeply Rooted

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    That is disgusting....
     
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  6. Nov 8, 2016
    ninnymary

    ninnymary Garden Master

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    I love figs and eat quite a few of them when in season. I have always looked at them closely when I slice or cut them. Never have I seen any live larvae or anything.

    Mary
     
  7. Nov 8, 2016
    Nyboy

    Nyboy Garden Master

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    I do believe only a few varieties are pollinated by wasps the rest by bees.
     
  8. Nov 10, 2016
    jackb

    jackb Garden Master

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    Before you burn your trees you might consider doing some research, common fig varieties like brown turkey do not need pollination by a wasp, or anything else, they are parthenocarpic.
    Below is a microscope image of a violet de bordeaux fig that I took this afternoon, everything inside the fruit belongs inside; nothing is moving around. The fruit only contains seeds, both mature and developing.

    From wikipedia:
    "The common fig is grown for its edible fruit throughout the temperate world. It is also grown as an ornamental tree, and the cultivar 'Brown Turkey' has gained the Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit.[17]

    Figs can be found in continental climates with hot summers as far north as Hungary and Moravia, and can be harvested up to four times per year. Thousands of cultivars, most named, have been developed as human migration brought the fig to many places outside its natural range.

    Two crops of figs are potentially produced each year.[18] The first or breba crop develops in the spring on last year's shoot growth. In contrast, the main fig crop develops on the current year's shoot growth and ripens in the late summer or fall. The main crop is generally superior in both quantity and quality to the breba crop. However, some cultivars produce good breba crops (e.g., 'Black Mission', 'Croisic', and 'Ventura').

    There are basically three types of edible figs:[19]

    • Persistent (or common) figs have all female flowers that do not need pollination for fruiting; the fruit can develop through parthenocarpic means. This is a popular horticulture fig for home gardeners. Dottato (Kadota), Black Mission, Brown Turkey, Brunswick, and Celeste are some representative cultivars.
    • Caducous (or Smyrna) figs require cross pollination by the fig wasp with pollen from caprifigs for the fruit to mature. If not pollinated the immature fruits drop. Some cultivars are Smyrne (Lob Incir in Turkey) - (Calimyrna in the Great Central Valley USA), Marabout, Inch├ário, and Zidi.
    • Intermediate (or San Pedro) figs set an unpollinated breba crop, but need pollination for the later main crop. Examples are Lampeira, King, and San Pedro.
    The fig likes dry sunny sites, the soil dry or drained. Excessive growth has to be limited to promote the fruiting. It thrives in both sandy and rocky soil. As the sun is really important it is better to avoid shades. Some varieties are more adapted to harsh and wet climates."

    microfig.JPG
     
    Last edited: Nov 11, 2016
    thistlebloom likes this.
  9. Nov 10, 2016
    Nyboy

    Nyboy Garden Master

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    Feeling much better have Brown Turkey and Chicago Hardy figs
     

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