Lawn Top Dressing

Txchikngardners

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Interesting topic nifty. We have noticed that when we move the tractor the feed ring left by the chikens billing out feed will mold then disappear, then the most beautiful dark green grass comes up there, at first in the form of a ring then spreads out. Same principle I guess. Keep us posted on the experiment.

Randy and Brenda
 

digitS'

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EG My side yard was once a driveway. It was fairly easy to realize this since our little shop/carport is in the back of the lot. The carport is no longer used for the purpose intended, I suppose. Right now, it's half full of potting soil and fertilizers and then there's a spare refrigerator for the garden produce.

The driveway was once surfaced with pea gravel! It was not possible to realize this until I tried to put a flower bed in the middle of it. That didn't work so well and I reseeded it to lawn. Fortunately, it is directly in front of the the hen house and even just rinsing water and food containers over the years has resulted in lush new growth.

There has been a more-or-less lawn in the side yard for probably the last 20 plus years but I've only been here for 12. Even tho' I don't drive on it - it is not very level and there are the roots of 2 trees in that area.

Nifty, you used about 1/2 inch for top dressing. To completely level this area, I'd probably need to build up some of it more than an inch. Would it be possible or would that amount of material (top soil, I can't justify using my precious compost) kill the grass? And, if it would be too much to apply at once, could I do this over a couple of years and have the grass "climb" up out of the material?

Any experience with this level of extreme lawn rescue?

Steve
 

poppycat

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I'm also very interested to see how this works. My lawn is in a sorry state right now. I'm just not sure I want to spend my precious compost (and elbow-grease)on the lawn.

Maybe I'll try it in a small controlled section and see how it works.
 

Nifty

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Oh how I wish I was qualified and had the experience to answer your questions. My lawn is looking pretty bad this winter and I'm not sure what it could be.

The area where I did the deeper of the top dressing looks pretty good and the 1/2 inch I put on really helped. Keep in mind that a 1/2 inch of compost / topdressing probably won't end up raising your lawn 1/2 inch. I'm guessing multiple treatments over a period of time will be necessary.
 

Reinbeau

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It is amazing how much soil you can put on top of a lawn and have the grass work it's way up to the top. I had a full septic install, the whole yard was churned, scraped and covered, yet there are original lawn grasses coming through in a certain area.

To level an area I'd just add soil, even up to four to six inches (anything more than that I think would pretty much kill existing grasses). If you don't want to wait for the original lawn grasses to come through then seed those areas. I've done this before with great success. It may look blotchy for awhile, but it evens out pretty quickly. Youre biggest problem with be matching the existing grass. This lawn here was covered with fine fescue because it was mostly shaded, now most is in full sun. I use a seed called Rebel, it's a mix that is supposed to be good in shade or sun, and is somewhat drought tolerant. I will say the lawn is fairly green all summer, even through drought. The Rebel is hardy and grows fast enough that it's taken over most of the lawn, now, from the patches I've done over the years.
 

kybukabu

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Yes, what Reinbeau says I've found to be true. If you've got "good dirt", it's amazing what will grow. Last year, I went to the local nursery and bought some compost soil for my garden boxes.
Then when I saw what "good dirt" could do, I started filling holes in the lawn with it. (I mixed in a little sand to weight it down and help it go a little further.) Green stuff just started popping up everywhere! I think the green stuff is called grass - if I remember correctly.
:D
 
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Hello All,

I am new to this site, just got an email from BYC and found it. Myself, DH, dogs and peeps live in the country on 28 acres.

We have 3-4 acre front yard that is pretty much open but dotted with trees. Ever since we have lived here I have been trying to figure out how to have this whole area covered in a flower.

We have tried wildflowers to no avail. So now I want to try Clover. The pretty Crimson that is dotted along our GA highways, or any and or all of the colors of the Clover.

Does anyone have any suggestions, tips or hints that can help me acheive my front yard full of flowers.

Thanks Ahead of time for any help. :)
 

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