Maestro Peas

hdan

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Planted maestro Peas couple weeks ago. 2" high now and doing well.
The seed pack states this variety produces 30" vines, can be grown with or without staking.
Debating if I should stake or not. Wondering if a high wind could blow them over or not. Has anyone grown this variety before or any recommendations on staking these or not. Would like to here what members would recommend for this variety Maestro Peas in zone 7a.
 

heirloomgal

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Area size for the peas? My answer would be dependant on that. If it's a huge expanse, than leaving them be is probably the right way to go.

But if it's a packet or two you're growing I would highly recommend you stake them. Peas as a rule tend to produce better with support. I stake even the smallest variety, Tom Thumb. Any peas in close proximity to the ground are fair game for critters, and they like peas, especially earwigs. I've grown Maestro and used a 4 foot trellis. But it doesn't need to be that complicated - I also gather an armload of branchy sticks and poke them in among the vines if they're block planted. Pea sticks work very well and you don't even see them once the vines reach their full height. For a small pea row or patch, pinching the tips early on will increase your yields and help them fare better in high heat.

Sometimes pea packets say 'self supporting' but I've found that is usually untrue. It's a selling angle to convince you they're a convenient & easy variety. Tomatoes technically don't need to be staked either, but they do much, much better if they're held up.
 

hdan

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Area size for the peas? My answer would be dependant on that. If it's a huge expanse, than leaving them be is probably the right way to go.

But if it's a packet or two you're growing I would highly recommend you stake them. Peas as a rule tend to produce better with support. I stake even the smallest variety, Tom Thumb. Any peas in close proximity to the ground are fair game for critters, and they like peas, especially earwigs. I've grown Maestro and used a 4 foot trellis. But it doesn't need to be that complicated - I also gather an armload of branchy sticks and poke them in among the vines if they're block planted. Pea sticks work very well and you don't even see them once the vines reach their full height. For a small pea row or patch, pinching the tips early on will increase your yields and help them fare better in high heat.

Sometimes pea packets say 'self supporting' but I've found that is usually untrue. It's a selling angle to convince you they're a convenient & easy variety. Tomatoes technically don't need to be staked either, but they do much, much better if they're held up.
My first time planting Maestro Peas. have a 4'×8' raised bed with two rows of peas. One row 12" inward from each side leaving 24" between the two rows. I think you're saying I should stake them. Not sure what you're saying about pinching back or where to pinch back.

Dan
 

heirloomgal

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My first time planting Maestro Peas. have a 4'×8' raised bed with two rows of peas. One row 12" inward from each side leaving 24" between the two rows. I think you're saying I should stake them. Not sure what you're saying about pinching back or where to pinch back.

Dan
Yes, stake them. They will probably flop over if you don't.

Here's a good video showing how to pinch peas - time stamp 4:40 exactly. It's only a few seconds long, but you'll see it's simple. I wouldn't let the pea vines grow this tall before pinching though.

 

hdan

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Yes, stake them. They will probably flop over if you don't.

Here's a good video showing how to pinch peas - time stamp 4:40 exactly. It's only a few seconds long, but you'll see it's simple. I wouldn't let the pea vines grow this tall before pinching them.
Ok, thanks very much for info. Maybe 4" would be a good point to pinch back cutting couple sets leaves.
Also do you think bamboo sticks would work ok for staking.
I'm assuming would have to put a bamboo stick for each plant.
Or should I go with stakes on ends laced with string back and forth and up and down.🤔
 

hdan

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I’ve grown Maestro peas before, good producers. I’d go for a T-post at each end and run string .
I have two rowes. Would the two T-post go in between the two rowes catch both rowes, or T-post both ends each row, and running string horizontal and vertical?
 

hdan

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2 T posts for each row. You can run string, or you can use pea netting.
Thanks, but what's the T for.
I was thinking just straight post each end with horizontal string at bottom and top with vertical zigzag string pattern across from one end to the other looping top and bottom horizontal string. How would you string a T-post. Not sure how you would do T-post unless stringing it into a y shape. Never done this before.
 

heirloomgal

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Thanks, but what's the T for.
I was thinking just straight post each end with horizontal string at bottom and top with vertical zigzag string pattern across from one end to the other looping top and bottom horizontal string. How would you string a T-post. Not sure how you would do T-post unless stringing it into a y shape. Never done this before.
A T post is just a type of post. Here's a video of a fairly simple pea netting set up, but there is lots of set ups that work well.

 

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