Phaedra's 2023 Adventure

ducks4you

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Here is an article to help you.
 

Marie2020

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It's not opening on my phone I'll get back to this soon and look on line later. I couldn't find the best soil to use. I hope it will grow in clay later in the year

Thank you 😊
 
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ducks4you

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Yeah, I figured you wouldn't be transplanting NOW.
Just, our grocery stores sell bouquets of roses and who KNOWS what they are, or if they are hardy in our growing zone.
They carry no zoning label, just look pretty.
I almost bought a white rose at WM's gardening center. Then, I read the tag, and it said growing zone 10.
:eek:
That would be an epic failure.
 

Phaedra

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I've just bought a climbing rose at the wrong time of year for where I live. I would like the pot it for now and keep it indoors. It's an outdoor climbing rose, called "Paul's scarlet". 8 have not taken it out of the box yet and need to soak the ball.

View attachment 54901

Would the normal compost be okay? We only have clay soil here.

I soaked a good amount of aloe vera in water ready for a feed but would it be best to feed it with a rose feed at the appropriate time? 🤔
Hi Marie,

It's fine to use a pot to plant your bare-root rose and keep it from freezing. This is what nurseries or rose breeders do, too. Here we have below options --

(A). bare-root - cheapest, available from autumn
(B). potted (in fact, just bare-root+proper soil) - more expensive, every extra step counts, available from spring
(C). potted+developed - the most expensive, the most beautiful (usually about to blossom), available from late spring to early summer
(D). 50% discount of (C), after all flowers are gone and look sad, available from late summer

In fact, it's not bad at all to keep it in the pot for some time and transplant later according to the status of the rose. Potting compost will be fine, but it's not yet the right time to feed them.

For rose-related knowledge and hands-on, Paul Zimmermann and Jason from Fraser Valley Rose Farm (I attached two videos about growing bare-root roses) are both quite convincing experts in my opinion. Please take a look when you are available. I would buy another two climbing roses later for decorating my coming small shop. Let's keep chatting about roses. I love them!
 

Marie2020

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Hi Marie,

It's fine to use a pot to plant your bare-root rose and keep it from freezing. This is what nurseries or rose breeders do, too. Here we have below options --

(A). bare-root - cheapest, available from autumn
(B). potted (in fact, just bare-root+proper soil) - more expensive, every extra step counts, available from spring
(C). potted+developed - the most expensive, the most beautiful (usually about to blossom), available from late spring to early summer
(D). 50% discount of (C), after all flowers are gone and look sad, available from late summer

In fact, it's not bad at all to keep it in the pot for some time and transplant later according to the status of the rose. Potting compost will be fine, but it's not yet the right time to feed them.

For rose-related knowledge and hands-on, Paul Zimmermann and Jason from Fraser Valley Rose Farm (I attached two videos about growing bare-root roses) are both quite convincing experts in my opinion. Please take a look when you are available. I would buy another two climbing roses later for decorating my coming small shop. Let's keep chatting about roses. I love them!
I potted it today ;)

It's all trail and error with my gardening skills.
I used shop growing compost mixed with sand and chopped banana peel ( the latter just at the bottom of the pot) plus my wormer compost.
My little worms had chewed up some egg shells , so they have done well. I then added some aloe vera feed which I made from my plant as I read this may help with the root growth. I crushed egg shell on top of the pot and a sprinkle of coffee, I read the slugs avoid both.

20230208_165058.jpg


It's now inside on my table as we will have more frost during the nights

20230208_201248.jpg
 

Branching Out

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I love watching videos from Jason at Fraser Valley Rose Farm. He has some great tips for growing and also for propagating roses from cuttings.

There is also a good YouTube channel from Mike Kincaid that teaches how to propagate roses from cuttings. I tried his method just for fun, fully expecting it to be a complete failure. Instead, within a couple of years I ended up with five huge rose bushes. Then I had to completely redo the rose garden, because I had no place to put them. Lol. The best part is that I was able to copy a stunning long-stemmed red rose of my mom's; not sure of the name of it, but it may be a Chrysler Imperial. Her rose bush is getting quite old and decrepit, and I was afraid it would die. Now I have two young, healthy clones of it for posterity.
 

Phaedra

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I love watching videos from Jason at Fraser Valley Rose Farm. He has some great tips for growing and also for propagating roses from cuttings.

There is also a good YouTube channel from Mike Kincaid that teaches how to propagate roses from cuttings. I tried his method just for fun, fully expecting it to be a complete failure. Instead, within a couple of years I ended up with five huge rose bushes. Then I had to completely redo the rose garden, because I had no place to put them. Lol. The best part is that I was able to copy a stunning long-stemmed red rose of my mom's; not sure of the name of it, but it may be a Chrysler Imperial. Her rose bush is getting quite old and decrepit, and I was afraid it would die. Now I have two young, healthy clones of it for posterity.
I also enjoy watching Mike Kincaid's videos, which gave me a lot of confidence to try propagation from cuttings!

Just like many things in life that look so challenging before hands-on. Propagation from cuttings is really nothing to lose. I love it.

Last year, after many successes propagating practices, I bought a few more special varieties of Pelargoniums, like this 'Madame Auguste Nonin.' I did hope that they would be as robust as the much more general varieties - and easy to regrow. So, I cut one or two cuttings from each plant.

They are easy to regrow, too. Thankfully I did so. The mother plant died when the first lasting frost hit. The younger plants survived. I didn't know exactly why, but, it's similar for vegetables - younger seedlings often can adapt coldness a bit better.

The daughter plant was kept indoors since then and grows well.
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This is the flower of this variety, and I look forward to greet them.
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It is still my fault to leave them in the unheated greenhouse, and I underestimated the power of nature (also overestimated the protection of a glass greenhouse).

About two weeks ago, I bought a small greenhouse heater. It did nice work and kept the temperature just from freezing. A lesson for me~
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Phaedra

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Tomorrow is again my sowing Friday, so I pricked out some seedlings and moved them into an 84-cell module tray. Seven germination domes are again ready for sowing.
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They are also practical for propagation purposes. Most guests are leftover rose stems (cut flowers from flower shops/discounters) or my pinched MUMs.
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I am suddenly overwhelmed by how many ways I can use such 1L milk bottles!

Left side -- Multisown peas (for shoots) on Jan-31 and scallions on Jan-27
Right side -- Tea MUMs propagated from the pinched stems!!! OMG, they are so resilient and so eager to live!! I will post in the MUMs thread later about this propagation practice on the pinched stems, 100% soft cuttings.

2792.jpg
 

Phaedra

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Phaedra,
You have a very efficient production line going. Are all of these plants for your own personal garden, or do you sell some as well?
It's for my personal garden, but also an ongoing practice. I did sell few homesaved seeds, bulbs, cut flowers, veggies, and young plants - most for fun.

My target is to open a small shop in two years and offer what I can offer then. ✌️
 
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