Phaedra's Adventure

Phaedra

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I got some lovely photos today.

Young female cone of European Spruce
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The hen (left) who almost lost her eyesight - she kind of cuddling with one sister (three were hatched by our senior hen) during their laying time. Theoretically, she should be at the lowest pecking order, but so far, other hens are pretty nice to her. Compared with another flock, mmm, our two flocks developed totally temperaments and characters, I will conclude so.
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It seems wild garlics love their new apartments (pots) I prepared for them, in the most shady area (no direct sunlight) of the grey house. These two weeks, everything in the garden is covered with a thick layer of willow pollen, literally everywhere.
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I am still working on re-organizing this area, but it already shows very good potentiality to become a charming spot.
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The forecast said a storm with strong wind and heavy rain is approaching. So, I transplanted all grapes and berry shrubs, sprinkled seeds that can facilitate bio-diversity, storing most of gardening tools under roof, and built a simple rain water collection mechanism for the lid of the compost bay.

One of the new plants I bought this year - dark purple raspberry. After planting it, I gave a bit extra 'training' so the branches are no longer squeezed in the center - will be good for its following growth.
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Seeds - I mixed the store-bought ones (for bio-diversity), home saved flower seeds, and whatever seeds I don't want to seriously grow any longer. As I want to get gid of some raised beds, I used some soil for this purpose.
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I did the similar experiment in front of the grey house earlier, but I covered them with grass clippings for protection - the seeds are emerging well.
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Lovely veggies in different shapes and greens
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Now, thank heaven for watering the entire garden and replenishing all rain barrels.
 

Phaedra

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So...I am confused.
If you know that the bulb is small, you should cut off the flowers and force it to grow good roots?
My beds are crowded. Does a small bulb produce any flowers?
Your thoughts...
It's up to you. If the bulb is small, or there are very few leaves (most of the time, one or two leaves) - that means the bulbs are too small to support showy flowers. You can just snip off the flowers, so the plants can keep growing and storing energy to the bulbs.

Some nurseries sell very large bulbs to ensure the consumers will get showy flowers. You will see when they mark their bulbs with numbers. Usually, 12~14cm circumference will be taken as premium bulbs (for tulips). Some will sell 8~10cm bulbs with much cheaper prices, as you might get smaller flowers, or need to wait for another growing season.
 

Phaedra

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I removed the second container (as my mini ponds in the main garden) to an east-facing spot. We plan to put down two dead Korean firs, and this spot might have much more sunlight after that. Therefore, I also transplanted two apple trees in this area this week.

When I started using such containers as mini ponds, I simply added a small basket of water lily, water, and a solar fountain. That's it. However, this year, I want to try something different. This spot has good light, and the growing trees will offer some shades later. It has the potentiality to be a multifunctional water feature.
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I tried to use garden soil (mostly clay) and transplanted some forget-me-not and bogbean from the edge of our lotus pond. As they are marginal plants that love damp environment, it should be worthy for a trial.

But as shown, I need something on the surface so the soil won't be splashed away.
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I will add oxygenators (just ordered hornwort and spiked water-milfoil) in both containers, and the 2024 edition mini ponds will be completed.
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Meanwhile, I am trying to build a lazy-but-working 'stair' that we can walk into the hoop tunnel #1 easier. Otherwise, the entrance is always muddy during winter and spring. So far, it looks promising.

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Corner by corner, the 2024 garden will show its charm.
 

Phaedra

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Phaedra your gardens are gorgeous. I'm working on my own flower garden I plan to put some herbs in it so that it's showy, sweet and edible plus side is it will feed beneficial pollinators. I really hope it works out for me because my soil is just yucky.
I believe it will work out, and you will enjoy both herbs and flowers very much. :D
 

Phaedra

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Rain in the morning, so I stayed in the kitchen and enjoyed breakfast, music, and the garden magazine.
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The strawberry shortcake that I made yesterday
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This week, I took a small order and prepared three lunch boxes for DH's colleague.
Kind of Asian fusion meals :D
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Everything is growing nicely.
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Very unique lettuce
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Phaedra

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Potting seedlings on - The first batch of annual/biennial flowering plants I grew from seeds this year - Dahlias, Nasturtiums, Zinnias, Hoary stocks (Matthiola incana), Sweet Williams, Bachelor Buttons, Pansies, and Snapdragons.
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The celeries regrew from the base look very positive now. It's my first time to regrow them. I might transplanted them into larger pots and let them stay in the greenhouse.
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Look at those 'energetic' roots! If this works, I can always do so - no need to sow them from seeds, and just a few plants would be enough for me (DD and DH have no love for celery).
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Potting seedlings on - The first batch of annual/biennial flowering plants I grew from seeds this year - Dahlias, Nasturtiums, Zinnias, Hoary stocks (Matthiola incana), Sweet Williams, Bachelor Buttons, Pansies, and Snapdragons.
View attachment 65333
The celeries regrew from the base look very positive now. It's my first time to regrow them. I might transplanted them into larger pots and let them stay in the greenhouse.
View attachment 65334
Look at those 'energetic' roots! If this works, I can always do so - no need to sow them from seeds, and just a few plants would be enough for me (DD and DH have no love for celery).
View attachment 65335
I have some celery root in water in the kitchen window until it gets some good roots on it. Then it's out to the garden.
 

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