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Where to buy sedge in NJ?

Discussion in 'Lawns & Landscaping' started by Andrew, Jul 15, 2017.

  1. Jul 15, 2017
    Andrew

    Andrew Chillin' In The Garden

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    Ironically (based on my other "getting rid of grasses in beds" thread) I'd like to use sedge to fill others.

    I just read an article linked by a friend here, and I really like the idea, but am not sure I'd know where to start looking.

    I live in Southern NJ.

    thanks,
    Andrew
     
  2. Jul 16, 2017
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    Most nurseries will carry it. Grasses in general have gained in popularity in recent years and the nurseries I shop at here have a large grass section where you can find sedges. I realize we're on opposite side of the country but nurseries follow trends like most retail operations, so it shouldn't be too hard to find. Good luck!
     
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  3. Jul 16, 2017
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Garden Master

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    Never heard of anyone WANTING to plant sedge before...around here it's the bane of the farmer's hay fields. Invasive if not kept cut and controlled.
     
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  4. Jul 16, 2017
    baymule

    baymule Garden Master

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    You already have sedge. Pull it out of your garden and plant it where you want it. According to the article link, it will fill in, in 2-3 years.

    I'm with Bee, I HATE the stuff and marvel that people actually plant it on purpose. But maybe the sedge that I fight isn't as pretty as other types. I still wouldn't plant it. Before I plant anything, I research it to death, for invasiveness and toxicity. Trees and bushes that I know and love, I refuse to plant, so I just enjoy them on other people's property.
     
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  5. Jul 16, 2017
    Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Garden Master

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    Bee, there are a lot of different sedges. The one I'm familiar with is nutsedge. It's invaded my yard and garden, to me it's worse than Bermuda in the garden. You just can't kill it out and it reproduces like mad. I don't know what variety of sedge you have in those hayfields but I can see it as a problem. it grows on colonies and can crowd out the good grasses. I don't know if cows or horses will eat it either, best I can tell my chickens won't, at least the nutsedge. But there are a lot they call ornamental and landscapers recommend planting them. They even say wildlife will eat it. Maybe they are talking about those undomesticated goats (venison) or wild boar. Maybe it's like mint, fine if you can keep it contained. Some sedges do well in some sunshine but most need shade. Most need it damp or wet too, maybe you can contain it with lack of moisture. Maybe some are not that invasive.

    Andrew, I'd check with nurseries as Thistle mentioned. Do you have a gardening column in your local paper, I have one in the Saturday paper. You could contact them for suggestions, not only where to get it but which varieties might work best for you where you want to use it. She mentioned sedge in her column a few weeks back and said she grows it in the shade where grass won't grow. Your local Master Gardeners can probably help both with where to get it and which to get. You can probably contact them through your county extension office.
     
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  6. Jul 16, 2017
    Andrew

    Andrew Chillin' In The Garden

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    Morning everyone,

    Well... I'll definitely take a closer look/read before doing anything "drastic".

    @baymule , do you mean the stuff growing rogue in my beds from the other post? I didn't know that's sedge, but it's certainly not growing like the article seems to indicate.

    That said, maybe I should look for another more controllable ground cover to fill in, and possibly use some deep-ish edging to help control. Hm..
     
  7. Jul 16, 2017
    Beekissed

    Beekissed Garden Master

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    The sedge in our hay fields is broom sedge....very pretty in autumn, but farmers hate the stuff as livestock won't eat it and it takes over the hay/pasture.

    [​IMG]

    Now we are starting to see stands of pampas grass going wild here and there...might be the next invasive "ornamental" type of grass we'll see next.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Jul 17, 2017
    baymule

    baymule Garden Master

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    I hate pampas grass. It is awful stuff. I would never plant it for any reason. I research something to death before I plant it. I research it for invasiveness and toxicity.

    @Andrew, the nut grass in your garden, determined to take over the world, is sedge. Chuffa is in wildlife mixes--and it is nut grass. Read labels and know what you are purchasing. Google it and read up on it before planting! Even innocent birdseed mixes has thistle seed in it! And who wants a yard or field full of thistle?
     

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