2023 Little Easy Bean Network - Beans Beyond The Colors Of A Rainbow

heirloomgal

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i don't have the patience for wading through websites or regulations. it is one thing i've always had a major block with dealing with gov't or authorities. i hit a page of gibberish and am not sure what i'm reading actually applies and i give up and go do something else, like right now i'm really liking my nap idea...
It's totally legal to send cash via mail to Belgium, it was just stolen by a clever person along the way who could detect the bills inside the envelope, though I did my best to conceal it. There is a woman in BC from Russia who had a huge tomato shop, but had a policy to not fulfil orders from Russia. She said over 50% of them get stolen. So I guess, this kind of theft is not totally uncommon.
 

Zeedman

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I finally got around to weighing & taking photos of the rest of my beans. A disappointing year for the most part; hardly any of the Phaseolus beans performed as well as in years past. All of these beans were grown from transplants, 8 sets of two.

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"Blue Blockeye", pole wax. Obtained from a Wisconsin SSE member in 2007. Fairly short yellow pods 4-5" long; not especially productive, I keep hoping for a better performance. 2015 seed, had zero germination when direct-seeded in my rural garden in 2021 (probably one of the first fatalities of the seed corn maggot) but over 90% when started as transplants. Weak runners, which is what I recall of previous grow outs. 16 ounces of seed.

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"Clem & Sarah's Big Bean", bush dry. From a Washington SSE member. The first grow out was in a wet year, and only a single plant survived; it has done much better since. Rather late DTM, but ripens completely, and produces fat, elongated, seed. This was weeded late, and in the partial shade of a trellis of Sieva limas directly to the West, but still produced18 ounces.
 

jbosmith

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A soybean question, mostly for @Zeedman but I thought I'd post it here in case others are interested. Is there a super short season black soybean that's worth growing? I tried Panther this year, and the harvest window for edamame was incredibly long, but even with our extra month+ of growing weather, only a few were anywhere close to dry.
 

Zeedman

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A soybean question, mostly for @Zeedman but I thought I'd post it here in case others are interested. Is there a super short season black soybean that's worth growing? I tried Panther this year, and the harvest window for edamame was incredibly long, but even with our extra month+ of growing weather, only a few were anywhere close to dry.
Can't find much info on Panther, but it appears to mature between 100-120 days. I have several black soybeans that are earlier, but most are small seeded. "Rouest 13 A1 2" is early, fairly large seeded, and has a decent yield. About 45% protein by dry weight too, higher than most commercial edamame. I grew it last year, but can't remember if I've tried it as edamame... not sure I posted photos of it last year either. Here is a photo on an index card for scale, so you can compare it to "Panther".
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Blue-Jay

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Tennessee Wonder - Pole Snap - Old snap bean variety introduced into the seed trade in the early 1900's but goes back into the 1800's. The bean did well grown in my back yard. I hadn't grown this bean since 2016. I had about 8 to 10 plant all total and they produced 22.65 ouces of seed, 642 grams.

Theresa Marchese - Pole Snap - Seeds look more like a horticultural or cranberry bean but they serve as pretty good stringless snap bean. Also said to be a good dry bean. Brought to this country to the state of Michigan in the early 1900's from Sicily. I think they were named after someone who grew them for a long time in the Michigan family who was related to the person who brought them into this country. I had grown about 8 to 10 plants and harvested 34.15 ounces of seed, 968 grams.

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Tennessee Wonder - Pole Snap.................................Theresa Marchese - Pole Snap/Dry
 

Blue-Jay

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Trebulino Di Domenico - Pole Dry. Beautiful Italina bean. Another bean that struggled all summer and is normally a very productive variety. Harvested .90 of an ounce, 25 grams.

Tresnjevac - Pole Dry. Acquired some seed from Beans & Herbs in the UK. It grew fairly but I'm sure I haven't seen anything near it's potential. I'm don't know what European country it's from but it has seed that looks so similar to Kartoffelbohne. I harvested from 2 plants 6.75 ounces of seed, 191 grams.

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Trebulino Di Domenico - Pole Dry..............................Tresenjevec - Pole Dry
 
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jbosmith

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Can't find much info on Panther, but it appears to mature between 100-120 days. I have several black soybeans that are earlier, but most are small seeded. "Rouest 13 A1 2" is early, fairly large seeded, and has a decent yield. About 45% protein by dry weight too, higher than most commercial edamame. I grew it last year, but can't remember if I've tried it as edamame... not sure I posted photos of it last year either. Here is a photo on an index card for scale, so you can compare it to "Panther".
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Panther was something I got somewhere local, but I think it's a Stone Barns variety, and they have a similar climate to me. I knew I might be in trouble when it made huge plants. The bean size is pretty comparable to the pic above.

I feel like I should add, in Panther's defense, this year was whacky, it was grown in saturated soil, and did better than it's neighbors at tolerating it. The cabbage that was on one side just rotted, and the normally 5' pintos on the other made spindly 2-3' vines with a couple pods each. Panther was a little pale for a while but kept going. I wouldn't necessarily encourage others to write this variety off from my experience this year, especially if they cared more about edamame than dry seed.

I did grow Bei 77-6177 at the other end of this garden, and it was much earlier. I think I'd be saying that when comparing Bei-77-6177 to most things though.
 

heirloomgal

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Panther was something I got somewhere local, but I think it's a Stone Barns variety, and they have a similar climate to me. I knew I might be in trouble when it made huge plants. The bean size is pretty comparable to the pic above.

I feel like I should add, in Panther's defense, this year was whacky, it was grown in saturated soil, and did better than it's neighbors at tolerating it. The cabbage that was on one side just rotted, and the normally 5' pintos on the other made spindly 2-3' vines with a couple pods each. Panther was a little pale for a while but kept going. I wouldn't necessarily encourage others to write this variety off from my experience this year, especially if they cared more about edamame than dry seed.

I did grow Bei 77-6177 at the other end of this garden, and it was much earlier. I think I'd be saying that when comparing Bei-77-6177 to most things though.
I grew a couple soybeans this year jb; Hoseki, Black Panther, Ugra Saja, Tankuro, Cha Cha Kure and a few others that got eaten by a rabbit. The BP was really late like yours, as late I'd say as those marbled soybeans and my plants were huge too. I had to dry them down indoors for a month before I shelled them, but the production was fantastic. Tankuro, which is black, was quite a bit earlier, plants were much smaller (and not as productive). A more sure bet though. Last year I grew Black Hokkaido and I found that pretty early too. Much like Tankuro.
 

jbosmith

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I grew a couple soybeans this year jb; Hoseki, Black Panther, Ugra Saja, Tankuro, Cha Cha Kure and a few others that got eaten by a rabbit. The BP was really late like yours, as late I'd say as those marbled soybeans and my plants were huge too. I had to dry them down indoors for a month before I shelled them, but the production was fantastic. Tankuro, which is black, was quite a bit earlier, plants were much smaller (and not as productive). A more sure bet though. Last year I grew Black Hokkaido and I found that pretty early too. Much like Tankuro.
Your marbled soy are on my garden plan for next year! So are your Black Eyed Susan peas.

I looked at Tankuro on Kitazawa the other day but it said 85 days, and I assumed that was an edamame number. Maybe that variety isn't as late as I thought. I also thought Hokkaido was a later variety. Hmm.
 

heirloomgal

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Your marbled soy are on my garden plan for next year! So are your Black Eyed Susan peas.

I looked at Tankuro on Kitazawa the other day but it said 85 days, and I assumed that was an edamame number. Maybe that variety isn't as late as I thought. I also thought Hokkaido was a later variety. Hmm.
I think the DTM estimation can be altered by extra heat units, and we had a quite hot summer this year. We hit 90F by early June. I also did 2 - 3 week old transplants. Probably should have mentioned that! Still, if I can get seeds I'm sure anybody can! 🤣
 
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