2023 Little Easy Bean Network - Beans Beyond The Colors Of A Rainbow

BeanieQueen

Attractive To Bees
Joined
May 13, 2022
Messages
51
Reaction score
218
Points
70
Location
Black Forest region, Germany

heirloomgal

Garden Addicted
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
3,690
Reaction score
11,851
Points
235
Location
Northern Ontario, Canada
What a bunch of us on Facebook have concluded about when they give people 30 day suspensions and delete accounts. Is that FB has over 2 billion users and they can not employ enough people to keep a watch on illicit postings. So they probably use artificial intelligence to scan Facebook for illicit postings and AI doesn't always get it right. Also when you disagree with one of their judgements. You might get a real person looking at a case or it also might be AI getting it wrong again. The whole thing is probably being controled by algorythms. How good are the algorythms that their coders produce.
I think you're right @Bluejay77 . I had a similar thing happen to me recently. I've been e-mailing myself photos because one of my SD cards is not being read by my laptop, so I need to use a different device and send them over. AI stormtroopers didn't like that for some reason, and last Saturday they suspended by email account. My email account is tied to my bank account; nearly all payment I receive from seed requesters is sent to me using my email account and vice versa. It's a very popular way of transferring $ in Canada. Thank goodness my email was eventually un-suspended, but it wasn't a pleasant experience!
 
Last edited:

heirloomgal

Garden Addicted
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
3,690
Reaction score
11,851
Points
235
Location
Northern Ontario, Canada
@heirloomgal

Is this the Guy Dirix website you have viewed? https://belleepoquemeise.be/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/Bonenlijst-2022.pdf.

If you need interpretations of the text let me know which varieties and I can give them to you in English.
Yes, there was a link someone posted a few pages back (thank you whoever posted that!) and it is a lovely site and attachment to peruse through. There wasn't any one bean in particular that caught my interest. It was sort of all of them. 🤣 You just see all these gorgeous beans in his pdf and look to the blurb - from where! what kind! oh my! There may be some function where it could be converted to another format and translated. Mr. Dirix has a lot of historical info on his site too, so he may have some of that written up next to his beans.
 

nune

Attractive To Bees
Joined
Dec 12, 2022
Messages
74
Reaction score
172
Points
65
Location
myaamionki (central indiana)
It says hello! (Yessica's Inca Bean)
20230127_070225.jpg
 

Paul G

Attractive To Bees
Joined
Oct 8, 2022
Messages
34
Reaction score
137
Points
68
Location
France Angouleme 8b
Or.. the officers of the customs authority haven't noticed yet that there are new EU standards.. Who knows!
But seriously: if there indeed should remain this difference btw. our EU countries, you or @Paul G or whoever are welcome to have their ordered shipments have sent so me, and I could send them along to you then.
Do you plan to grow network beans this year? And if so, were they already shipped?
Thank you for the offer!
I should receive some network beans within few days. If not, I will definitely contact you.
 

heirloomgal

Garden Addicted
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
3,690
Reaction score
11,851
Points
235
Location
Northern Ontario, Canada
I've watched a few Joseph Lofthouse videos lately, and read a little bit too. Some of the material specifically about beans. It's all been rather interesting and none of what he's talking about is familiar to me. I've always come from a preservationist point of view, with an interest in celebrating and keeping alive the wonder of man's work in the world of beans. I've actually had goals quite opposite to his as a gardener, because varietal purity is important to me.

But a couple things I'd be curious to hear people's thought on. He believes all beans, though I imagine he's referring to P.vulgaris in particular, have inbreeding depression. I was very surprised to read this! My initial thought was this seems difficult to imagine since the fertility apparatus of beans is designed to self pollinate? But I wonder if there is something I'm missing to this perspective? According to him, we are unable to properly assess the inbreeding depression because we compare all beans to other inbred beans. Of course, I'm sure anyone who has found a cross in their bean patch sees the vigor with which it grows, but a cross is a relatively rare event. My feeling has been that beans leans toward stability more so than instability naturally.
 

Jack Holloway

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Feb 3, 2022
Messages
242
Reaction score
854
Points
115
Location
Salem Oregon
I've watched a few Joseph Lofthouse videos lately, and read a little bit too. Some of the material specifically about beans. It's all been rather interesting and none of what he's talking about is familiar to me. I've always come from a preservationist point of view, with an interest in celebrating and keeping alive the wonder of man's work in the world of beans. I've actually had goals quite opposite to his as a gardener, because varietal purity is important to me.

But a couple things I'd be curious to hear people's thought on. He believes all beans, though I imagine he's referring to P.vulgaris in particular, have inbreeding depression. I was very surprised to read this! My initial thought was this seems difficult to imagine since the fertility apparatus of beans is designed to self pollinate? But I wonder if there is something I'm missing to this perspective? According to him, we are unable to properly assess the inbreeding depression because we compare all beans to other inbred beans. Of course, I'm sure anyone who has found a cross in their bean patch sees the vigor with which it grows, but a cross is a relatively rare event. My feeling has been that beans leans toward stability more so than instability naturally.
I haven't read any of his writings, but it sounds like what he is trying to do is make a landrace, which usually is genetically very diverse. Landraces can adapt to changes in their growing environment by some of the seeds having genes which allow their success. There are pluses and minuses to them. Many believe the pluses outway the minuses.

I am surprised by his statement that beans are inbred. What he might mean is that many varieties of beans have been bottlenecked, meaning they have been rescued from being lost by a single or a few seeds. This causes what genetic diversity in the variety there is, to be lost. of course, over time, with many people growing them, some genetic diversity will return. The flip side of that is growers not roguing out obvious off types from the population. These can occur from mutations or outcrossing, of just plain reverting. One of my frustrations is in canna lilies where the grower isn't roguing out the plain green plants from a variety that is black, or has a great deal of color, or is variegated. I buy the bulbs, and they don't grow true to type. :he

edited to add: I just realized I've strayed very far from beans.:eek::oops:o_O
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top