A Seed Saver's Garden 2021

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
10,319
Reaction score
10,703
Points
347
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
No, metallic green. They are an invasive species, and have been gradually spreading westward from the Atlantic coast, only appearing here about 5 years ago. According to the distribution maps, they are present in Ontario. The grubs feed in sod, and the adults attack many plants - especially beans, soybeans, mallows (including okra), grape vines, roses, raspberries, and even some of my trees. They attack in large numbers, often congregating in one place to strip leaves to the veins. I use commercial baited traps to reduce their numbers, and am currently catching over 100 beetles per day in each trap. :ep I also allow Malva sylvestris "Zebrina" to grow on the garden borders, it is very attractive to the beetles & acts as a trap crop (where I can spray easily them through the fence).
Japanese beetles

metallic brownish coppery color. the best time to pick them off plants is in the early morning when they are cooler and aren't flying as easily. once they warm up they'll fly away more.

they sure do like beans and grape vines. both of those are good trap crops. and certain beans are more attractive than others Purple Dove is usually one that takes a beating and the soybeans this year are also getting some action. not surprising because the fields all around us are all soybeans and the beetles are on them too but i think they like coming here because i don't spray anything. i'd hate to think what traps would get here. i know i have picked hundreds a day off the wild grape vines for months at a time with no real affect in population or the feeding on bean plants. i don't want to treat because i don't want to affect the butterfly population. i think this is the first year in a while that i've seen monarchs around.
 

Ridgerunner

Garden Master
Joined
Mar 20, 2009
Messages
7,873
Reaction score
8,573
Points
397
Location
Southeast Louisiana Zone 9A
I have found climbing peas to be difficult to grow straight up, they always seem to lean away from vertical position. I guess one can't underestimate the weight from the wispy vines. How to grow them without leaning is the next challenge for me and the peas.
I think peas may be more influenced by wind than beans are. The stem is pretty weak. In Arkansas I'd grow Little Marvel, a bush pea that did not need to be trellised. My predominant wind was out of the south in that valley. The Little Marvels would wind up laying to the north. Really laying to the north. The bush beans might have a little northern lean to them but nothing like the peas. The sun was in the south so they were not growing toward that, pretty sure it was the wind.
 

digitS'

Garden Master
Joined
Dec 13, 2007
Messages
21,782
Reaction score
14,662
Points
457
Location
border, ID/WA(!)
Lois Hole, @heirloomgal ? I remember reading her books years ago and thinking, "She is in Edmonton! If she can grow it. I can!"

Chard may have become a popular garden veggie just about the time I was growing up. Those white stems! And soon, other colors! I was completely unimpressed. It was the heavy stem that I didn't like. Jump forward several decades and I discovered Verde da Taglio. Thin stems (the way chard is supposed to be ;)). Limited availability: Seeds from Italy and Baker Creek have it.

Rose greenhouse experience led me to build most trellises the way we did it there - with pea modifications ;). Here is a picture on TEG ... July 15, 2014 Horizontal cross boards can't be seen.

Steve
 

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
10,319
Reaction score
10,703
Points
347
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
I think peas may be more influenced by wind than beans are. The stem is pretty weak. In Arkansas I'd grow Little Marvel, a bush pea that did not need to be trellised. My predominant wind was out of the south in that valley. The Little Marvels would wind up laying to the north. Really laying to the north. The bush beans might have a little northern lean to them but nothing like the peas. The sun was in the south so they were not growing toward that, pretty sure it was the wind.

it depends upon how many tendrils they have for holding on. some varieties have a lot more than others.
 

heirloomgal

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
837
Reaction score
2,436
Points
145
Location
Ontario, Canada
Lois Hole, @heirloomgal ? I remember reading her books years ago and thinking, "She is in Edmonton! If she can grow it. I can!"

Chard may have become a popular garden veggie just about the time I was growing up. Those white stems! And soon, other colors! I was completely unimpressed. It was the heavy stem that I didn't like. Jump forward several decades and I discovered Verde da Taglio. Thin stems (the way chard is supposed to be ;)). Limited availability: Seeds from Italy and Baker Creek have it.

Rose greenhouse experience led me to build most trellises the way we did it there - with pea modifications ;). Here is a picture on TEG ... July 15, 2014 Horizontal cross boards can't be seen.

Steve
You know Louis Hole! Weren't her gardening books so down to earth & charming? I used to have her whole collection. She was a big inspiration for me 14 years ago, when I started gardening. I'd love to reread some of those books now.

Those peas look very, very vertical. That must be a very good way to keep them upright. Are there strings running across in there like a t- post?
 

heirloomgal

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
837
Reaction score
2,436
Points
145
Location
Ontario, Canada
don't they make rice flour wrappers for things? i thought i saw that. also as a variation would be buckwheat. just try making a small amount first to make sure it's ok, then make it for everyone else and don't tell them what's in it. :)

that sounds good to me too. we'd probably just make it with pasta, but getting Mom past the chard is a hard sell here. i don't even bother growing it because i hate wasting space growing things she won't eat, i'd rather grow more beans anyways so it's ok. i sneak a few turnips in here or there instead but i can't cook them unless she's gone. haha... it's so funny to me that she will eat brocolli and cauliflower but not turnips or cabbage. i love all of those, can't grow most of them except turnips.
Nearly all wheat flour creations I either can create a good alternative for, or buy one if need be. Phyllo is one of the few exceptions! 😕 But that's okay, still lots of good stuff to eat anyway☺
 

heirloomgal

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
837
Reaction score
2,436
Points
145
Location
Ontario, Canada
No, metallic green. They are an invasive species, and have been gradually spreading westward from the Atlantic coast, only appearing here about 5 years ago. According to the distribution maps, they are present in Ontario. The grubs feed in sod, and the adults attack many plants - especially beans, soybeans, mallows (including okra), grape vines, roses, raspberries, and even some of my trees. They attack in large numbers, often congregating in one place to strip leaves to the veins. I use commercial baited traps to reduce their numbers, and am currently catching over 100 beetles per day in each trap. :ep I also allow Malva sylvestris "Zebrina" to grow on the garden borders, it is very attractive to the beetles & acts as a trap crop (where I can spray easily them through the fence).
Japanese beetles
Oh, I didn't know that. I'm not sure I've seen these guys in my garden. I always thought the hard, fire engine red small bugs/beetles eating my lily plants every spring were JB'S. From your description I hope I never see these things!!!
 

heirloomgal

Deeply Rooted
Joined
Jan 17, 2021
Messages
837
Reaction score
2,436
Points
145
Location
Ontario, Canada
L
I think peas may be more influenced by wind than beans are. The stem is pretty weak. In Arkansas I'd grow Little Marvel, a bush pea that did not need to be trellised. My predominant wind was out of the south in that valley. The Little Marvels would wind up laying to the north. Really laying to the north. The bush beans might have a little northern lean to them but nothing like the peas. The sun was in the south so they were not growing toward that, pretty sure it was the wind.
Little Marvel's such a great bush pea; sturdy, tough and remarkably productive for its size. Some varieties are super common for good reason, and this is one of them I think. This one is a keeper for me.
 

flowerbug

Garden Master
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
10,319
Reaction score
10,703
Points
347
Location
mid-Michigan, USoA
Oh, I didn't know that. I'm not sure I've seen these guys in my garden. I always thought the hard, fire engine red small bugs/beetles eating my lily plants every spring were JB'S. From your description I hope I never see these things!!!

i don't see them early in the season.

1280px-Japanese_Beetles_(Popillia_japonica)_-_Guelph%2C_Ontario.jpg



i hope you don't ever see them too! :)

i think they are kinda pretty as far as bugs go, but they're so voracious and do so much damage that i'd not wish them upon anyone.
 
Top