Advice for Starting/Growing Peppers?

seedcorn

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@Zeedman, great info.

Steve , I didn’t realize they were a perennial until visited Louisiana where a Indian had a plant several years old. Looked like a tree. Every year, I say I’m going to pot one and bring inside-after 8 years, still haven’t.
 

Zeedman

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When I lived in San Diego, I was able to over-winter pepper plants in the garden several times. They would look pretty sad after going through the Winter; but once the weather warmed, I pruned them back hard & they bounced back. Did the same thing with eggplant too, but those did poorly the second year.
 

catjac1975

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Before running headlong into unfamiliar territory, I thought I'd ask:

What is your best advice for starting and growing peppers?

In case it makes a difference: one variety is hot, the others sweet.. oh, and pepperoncini (not sure if that is considered hot?).
Peppers are the only seed I grow from saved seed. I like yellow and red peppers, I am not a fan of heat. I had a bad time with germination form purchased red Burpee pepper seeds a number of times. I have even grown saved seed from store bought block colored peppers with great success. Normally I do not use any saved seed. I way over plant the seed in 6-pack seed flats, and then thin to 6 in each tray. Bottom heat is a must. I cover the soil with a piece of Susan wrap or wax paper to hold in the moisture. As soon as I see a bit of green I remove the covering. I will be starting them soon for planting outdoors in May. I think people who buy pepper seedings do not get much success until the season is almost over. Those seedings are not mature enough to produce early in the season. You need a nice sturdy mature seedling. And they love bottom heat.
 
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meadow

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Peppers are the only seed I grow from saved seed. I like yellow and red peppers, I am not a fan of heat. I had a bad time with germination form purchased red Burpee pepper seeds a number of times. I have even grown saved seed from store bought block colored peppers with great success. Normally I do not use any saved seed. I way over plant the seed in 6-pack seed flats, and then thin to 6 in each tray. Bottom heat is a must. I cover the soil with a piece of Susan wrap or wax paper to hold in the moisture. As soon as I see a bit of green I remove the covering. I will be starting them soon for planting outdoors in May. I think people who buy pepper seedings do not get much success until the season is almost over. Those seedings are not mature enough to produce early in the season. You need a nice sturdy mature seedling.
That's encouraging. What size pot do you wind up with at the end?
 

ninnymary

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Peppers take a long time to grow. I just started mine a week ago and they have already sprouted. They are in tiny cells so will eventually be up potted to 4" pots. I started them on a heat mat. They will be going under lights today.

Once they are a good size about 6" tall, I top them off. This encourages branching and a larger harvest. They will probably go into the ground around end of April.

Mary
 

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