Bell pepper leaf curl

hdan

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@hdan Because your plants are so beautifully green, and seem to show no other signs of problems my guess is that the leaf curling is just varietal; they may be responding to some subtle environmental condition that will resolve itself. I checked my peppers tonight and see that 2 of mine are exhibitng slight leaf curl as well but I know that all else is well with them so it's varietal. I've seen this phenomenon in perfectly healthy tomato plants some years. There could also be some slight genetic variations among the plants in a variety that account for it. I'd be willing to bet that once you get them outside they'll do just fine. Peppers have wierd carbohydrate storage mechanisms too, and because of that they sometimes exhibit oddities. Looks like it's the older leaves curling more so than young ones, which points a little to storage issues as well (which is also related to temperatures a bit). As they get exposed to higher temps they may straighten out.
Thank you for your input.
I do have a mixed variety of bell peppers.
@hdan Because your plants are so beautifully green, and seem to show no other signs of problems my guess is that the leaf curling is just varietal; they may be responding to some subtle environmental condition that will resolve itself. I checked my peppers tonight and see that 2 of mine are exhibitng slight leaf curl as well but I know that all else is well with them so it's varietal. I've seen this phenomenon in perfectly healthy tomato plants some years. There could also be some slight genetic variations among the plants in a variety that account for it. I'd be willing to bet that once you get them outside they'll do just fine. Peppers have wierd carbohydrate storage mechanisms too, and because of that they sometimes exhibit oddities. Looks like it's the older leaves curling more so than young ones, which points a little to storage issues as well (which is also related to temperatures a bit). As they get exposed to higher temps they may straighten out.
Thank you for your input I do have a mixed variety of bell peppers.
 

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digitS'

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I have 2 of these tubs: link. One is used for mixing soil, the other, for watering.

The watering tub takes up residence in the greenhouse at this time of year. Every plant container can go in although I have to be careful about depth since they may float and turn over. Flats with inserts of 4-packs can cycle through in about 20 minutes. Time for pots varies by pot size.

After watering, the trays are moved to where they can drip on the ground for quite-some-time. If they are being moved back into the house, it helps to tip the trays one-way and then the other during their drip cycle before they come into a place on a sheet of plastic in the overnight warmth of the utility room.
 

hdan

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I have 2 of these tubs: link. One is used for mixing soil, the other, for watering.

The watering tub takes up residence in the greenhouse at this time of year. Every plant container can go in although I have to be careful about depth since they may float and turn over. Flats with inserts of 4-packs can cycle through in about 20 minutes. Time for pots varies by pot size.

After watering, the trays are moved to where they can drip on the ground for quite-some-time. If they are being moved back into the house, it helps to tip the trays one-way and then the other during their drip cycle before they come into a place on a sheet of plastic in the overnight warmth of the utility room.

I have 2 of these tubs: link. One is used for mixing soil, the other, for watering.

The watering tub takes up residence in the greenhouse at this time of year. Every plant container can go in although I have to be careful about depth since they may float and turn over. Flats with inserts of 4-packs can cycle through in about 20 minutes. Time for pots varies by pot size.

After watering, the trays are moved to where they can drip on the ground for quite-some-time. If they are being moved back into the house, it helps to tip the trays one-way and then the other during their drip cycle before they come into a place on a sheet of plastic in the overnight warmth of the utility room.

I have 2 of these tubs: link. One is used for mixing soil, the other, for watering.

The watering tub takes up residence in the greenhouse at this time of year. Every plant container can go in although I have to be careful about depth since they may float and turn over. Flats with inserts of 4-packs can cycle through in about 20 minutes. Time for pots varies by pot size.

After watering, the trays are moved to where they can drip on the ground for quite-some-time. If they are being moved back into the house, it helps to tip the trays one-way and then the other during their drip cycle before they come into a place on a sheet of plastic in the overnight warmth of the utility room.
Nice to have the extra space to do that. I did go back and add another half cup to the bell peppers which made up 1-1/2 cups total each container. The up-take of water absorption was slowing on the last half.
The water needed for plants is usually .62 gallons per square foot.
My 8" pot is little over 1/4 (.34) square foot, .155 gallons is 1/4 of .62 gallons. 2.4 cups is needed for 8" pot. I stopped at 1.5 cups caused water absorption slowed down considerably.🤔
 
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hdan

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Nice to have the extra space to do that. I did go back and add another half cup to the bell peppers which made up 1-1/2 cups total each container. The up-take of water absorption was slowing on the last half.
The water needed for plants is usually .62 gallons per square foot.
My 8" pot is little over 1/4 (.34) square foot, .155 gallons is 1/4 of .62 gallons. 2.4 cups is needed for 8" pot. I stopped at 1.5 cups caused water absorption slowed down considerably.🤔
 
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hdan

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Nice to have the extra space to do that. I did go back and add another half cup to the bell peppers which made up 1-1/2 cups total each container. The up-take of water absorption was slowing on the last half.
The water needed for plants is usually .62 gallons per square foot.
My 8" pot is little over 1/4 (.34) square foot. .155 gallons is 1/4 of .62 gallons. 2.4 cups is needed for 8" pot. I stopped at 1.5 cups caused water absorption slowed down considerably.🤔

Update:
Bell peppers starting to look little better now.
I'm doing a soil moisture test to maybe tell when to water. With my finger in soil to first knuckle feels dry.
If push moisture meter in soil 1-1/2 to 2" into soil reads moisture level at 2-3. If push meter in soil 3" moisture reads 5-6. If push meter down to 4" it reads 9-10.
This is a 8" diameter pot 8" deep.
I know it has moisture 2" down from top all the way down to bottom of pot. Would like some input on this from the members.
 
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Alasgun

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I try to use all alike pots in the 3 sizes i keep And know from years of similarity what a 3.5, 5 inch and 2gal. Pot feels like with right out of the bag potting soil or that same pot well watered. Most water too much n my opinion.
i’ve also got this very cool moisture and P.H meter which i use steictly for moisture testing And trust it emphatically! Between these two methods im pretty comfortable. What you’ve just described sounds about perfect to me.


On the other hand; pots are the least used, temporary part of our garden. Once freezing weather is past everything, greenhouse garden and fruit trees all go on timers running drip lines. When you think about it watering can consume more of your time than most anything else!
 

hdan

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I try to use all alike pots in the 3 sizes i keep And know from years of similarity what a 3.5, 5 inch and 2gal. Pot feels like with right out of the bag potting soil or that same pot well watered. Most water too much n my opinion.
i’ve also got this very cool moisture and P.H meter which i use steictly for moisture testing And trust it emphatically! Between these two methods im pretty comfortable. What you’ve just described sounds about perfect to me.


On the other hand; pots are the least used, temporary part of our garden. Once freezing weather is past everything, greenhouse garden and fruit trees all go on timers running drip lines. When you think about it watering can consume more of your time than most anything else!
Not sure what you meaning, that sounds perfect.
Meaning water now or wait?
Just looking other members opinions.
 

Alasgun

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The condition you described to us; sounds perfect to me. There’s water in the pot and it doesn’t sound waterlogged. Trust your meter.

Bell peppers starting to look little better now.
I'm doing a soil moisture test to maybe tell when to water. With my finger in soil to first knuckle feels dry.
If push moisture meter in soil 1-1/2 to 2" into soil reads moisture level at 2-3. If push meter in soil 3" moisture reads 5-6. If push meter down to 4" it reads 9-10.
This is a 8" diameter pot 8" deep.
I know it has moisture 2" down from top all the way down to bottom of pot. Would like some input on this from the members.
 

hdan

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The condition you described to us; sounds perfect to me. There’s water in the pot and it doesn’t sound waterlogged. Trust your meter.

Bell peppers starting to look little better now.
I'm doing a soil moisture test to maybe tell when to water. With my finger in soil to first knuckle feels dry.
If push moisture meter in soil 1-1/2 to 2" into soil reads moisture level at 2-3. If push meter in soil 3" moisture reads 5-6. If push meter down to 4" it reads 9-10.
This is a 8" diameter pot 8" deep.
I know it has moisture 2" down from top all the way down to bottom of pot. Would like some input on this from the members.
Ok, so Im assuming when pot is dryed out 4" down from top it's time to think about watering.
 

ducks4you

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This year my peppers are tiny, BUT, last year, before transplanting, I had my sweet peppers in potting soil in 2 inch pots in a fish tank sitting in 3 inches of water constantly, under a gro light and the fish tank was on top of a heat mat. The water was warm and they loved it.
They love water and heat and enough light and humidity. We had a discussion last year about full sun vs partial shade.
Do a search on that.
 
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