1. Dismiss Notice
  2. Official TEG Poll: What is your garden style?
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  3. Spiders - Discussion Thread
    CLICK HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice
  4. TEG Picture of the Week (POW) - Submit your Pics Now !!
    Click HERE!
    (if you are logged in, this notice can be dismissed using the "x" to the top right of the notice)

    Dismiss Notice

berries or trees?

Discussion in 'Fruits & Vegetables' started by canesisters, May 23, 2018.

  1. May 23, 2018
    canesisters

    canesisters Garden Master

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    4,877
    Likes Received:
    5,181
    Trophy Points:
    317
    Location:
    Southeast VA
    I want to add fruit to my little farm. Probably next summer since this summer is focused on improving the veggi garden and expanding the chicken pen.

    I've never paid all that much attention to the threads here about fruit - because I didn't have any. :rolleyes::hide
    So! Before I go back searching through dozens and dozens of threads.....

    What is the best place to start when adding fruit to the garden??? Berries or trees?
    Something fairly low maintenance.
    Zone 7a
    Soil is mostly clay-x and tends toward acidic (was a pine forest before being cleared) - naturally grows buttercups by the millions. Can start now prepping soil for next summer's addition of plants.

    :)
     
  2. May 23, 2018
    digitS'

    digitS' Garden Master

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Messages:
    18,068
    Likes Received:
    6,814
    Trophy Points:
    457
    Location:
    border, ID/WA(!)
    Personally, I think that the best starting place is to do a local, scoping out of fruit production.

    It might be a little boring to have the same as what is available by the box just up the road. Nevertheless, it's disheartening to invest in fruit trees that are poorly suited for local soil and climate. Years of tending young trees may be followed by seasons of crop loss from too early blooming and late freezes and season after season of battling diseases because the tree is outside its best range.

    I finally took one peach tree out of the yard. It won't surprise me to feel the need to do that with the new one, DW just had to have. One or two good harvests out of 10 or so years of care doesn't feel right! Besides, apricot trees all but grow entirely on their own around here! We enjoyed the fruit of one in a vacant lot near our home for years.

    Now, having said that. Some trees are overlooked and not just our local apricots. French plums fit in here. I know that this is true with hazelnut, also. Every time I see one, which is very seldom, it's doing just fine.

    Steve
     
    sumi, canesisters and LocoYokel like this.
  3. May 23, 2018
    catjac1975

    catjac1975 Garden Master

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2010
    Messages:
    7,372
    Likes Received:
    5,368
    Trophy Points:
    357
    Location:
    Mattapoisett, Massachusetts
    Raspberries and blackberries, thornless are easy and prolific.
     
    Jared77, Carol Dee and canesisters like this.
  4. May 23, 2018
    Nyboy

    Nyboy Garden Master

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2010
    Messages:
    20,154
    Likes Received:
    14,922
    Trophy Points:
    427
    Location:
    White Plains NY,weekends Lagrange NY.
    A great starter fruit tree is mulberry. They are easy to grow don't need spraying. There are many varieties hardy different zones. I am in zone 5 and grow Illinois Everbearing. The berries are very sweet the reason you don't see mulberries for sale is they travel poorly. Another plus to the tree is their leafs are one of the most nutrient rich foods great for animal feed. They can be messy trees so give thought to where you plant. Keep away from parking area and patios. This tree is almost fool proof. bad side is deer know how good leaves are. Figs is another EZ fruit tree
     
    catjac1975, flowerbug and canesisters like this.
  5. May 23, 2018
    Todd Ziegler

    Todd Ziegler Garden Ornament

    Joined:
    May 5, 2016
    Messages:
    158
    Likes Received:
    69
    Trophy Points:
    97
    Location:
    Tipton, IN
    Most berries will produce as soon as the 2nd year with the 3rd year being full production However if you want fruit trees you may want to start this year because it could be 4 full years, not including the planting year, before you get any fruit. I would recommend doing both. For example; if you want good apples you will need two trees to help pollinate and if you start with a 2-3 year old tree, you may get some fruit by 2021. If you also plant raspberries or blackberries this year too, depending on how many you plant, you can expect enough fruit next year for a decent treat or enough for 6 jars of jam. Depending completely on how many you plant. With the 3rd year being full protection. However you won't see full production from your apples until 2023 with dwarf trees. By then you will be up to your neck in whatever berry you plant.
     
    sumi and thistlebloom like this.
  6. May 23, 2018
    Nyboy

    Nyboy Garden Master

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2010
    Messages:
    20,154
    Likes Received:
    14,922
    Trophy Points:
    427
    Location:
    White Plains NY,weekends Lagrange NY.
    You need to decide what size tree you want. Dwarf, semi dwarf or standard size. Dwarf trees produce the soonest. Standard will produce a lot more fruit but you need a ladder to get to it. Question is what fruit do you enjoy eating?
     
    ducks4you and valley ranch like this.
  7. May 23, 2018
    Todd Ziegler

    Todd Ziegler Garden Ornament

    Joined:
    May 5, 2016
    Messages:
    158
    Likes Received:
    69
    Trophy Points:
    97
    Location:
    Tipton, IN
    Very good advice!
     
  8. May 23, 2018
    baymule

    baymule Garden Master

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2011
    Messages:
    11,883
    Likes Received:
    11,565
    Trophy Points:
    387
    Location:
    Southeast Texas
    Why not both? Plant your fruit trees with berry trellis in between.
     
  9. May 23, 2018
    Carol Dee

    Carol Dee Garden Master

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2011
    Messages:
    9,572
    Likes Received:
    9,095
    Trophy Points:
    367
    Location:
    Long Grove, IA
    Blueberries do not mind acidic soil. We even mulch with pine bark!
    The thornless raspberries are great and quick to produce.
     
    ducks4you and valley ranch like this.
  10. May 24, 2018
    valley ranch

    valley ranch Garden Addicted

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2014
    Messages:
    4,142
    Likes Received:
    3,387
    Trophy Points:
    287
    Location:
    Sierra Nevada mountains, and Nevada high desert
    What DigitS posted makes good sense ~ don't listen to him ~ plant Tillton Apricots for sure, you have some cold winters I'd think ~ plumb & peaches ~ they like cold winters ``` Yeh ~ scope out what others have ~ but only those that have the fruit listed above ~ Virgina ~ Let me see what kind of weather your have there ```
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2018
    canesisters likes this.

Share This Page