best pH for growing white clover?

R2elk

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To me the one on the left looks like the surface cracking you'd get in a soil relatively high in organic matter, especially if it doesn't get that hard when it dries. If you soak sawdust and let it dry I'd expect the surface to look a lot like that.
I had a garden in at least a 20 year old sawdust dump. When it dried, it was powder. There was no cracking at all. It produced the best potatoes and tomatoes that I have ever grown.
 

mitch landen

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Thx much for all the valuable and insightful info. Who'd've thought it could be so complicated? But reasonable. The cemetery plot is small (only 8 graves there), so not too terrible for working, but ... still, effort.
Yesterday I drove there and did what I could do -- added lime, leaves, fertilizer, pond water (from my backyard pond; I figured it would have some goods that might be useful) and clay (mostly, just enough to hold the leaves down. Chopping into the hard soil ain't in the cards for me these days). Not the kind of superficial effort I'd've made back-when, but something. I'll keep adding to the area over time, as I have some the past 2 years. Better than nothing ....
 

flowerbug

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Thx much for all the valuable and insightful info. Who'd've thought it could be so complicated? But reasonable. The cemetery plot is small (only 8 graves there), so not too terrible for working, but ... still, effort.
Yesterday I drove there and did what I could do -- added lime, leaves, fertilizer, pond water (from my backyard pond; I figured it would have some goods that might be useful) and clay (mostly, just enough to hold the leaves down. Chopping into the hard soil ain't in the cards for me these days). Not the kind of superficial effort I'd've made back-when, but something. I'll keep adding to the area over time, as I have some the past 2 years. Better than nothing ....

that's pretty much how i would do it too, add a little on top and let the rains and gravity work it down further. if there haven't been many worms there before it is likely it would encourage them to stick around longer too. :) good luck and keep chipping away at it, that is how some of my projects go here too. :)
 

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