Broken Shovel Alert!

Dirtmechanic

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This is the last shovel that I bought. I had to order it because the blades on shovels sold in local stores sit at too much of angle in relation to the handle. To put the blade into the ground at 180° requires that the handle be almost at a 30° to the ground.

The shovel I bought is nearly vertical in line between the blade and handle. I got an ash handle but that was 6 years ago. It is now available in ash, fiberglass or composite. I personally don't care for fiberglass since the one that I have is very heavy and is deteriorating over its lifetime which causes fiberglass splinters in the hands if gloves aren't worn.

If I needed a new one, I would like to try out a composite handle.
I have not run across a composite handle yet, only steel, fg, and wood. I saw yours. I did not know what a caprock style was and had to read about it. I would need the point as our clay packs after a few rains. In the garden, with lots of organic material, that round shovel would do it. Elsewhere though I could stand on it and it would not penetrate from mid summer until the rains of November start up our wet season.
 
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R2elk

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I have not run across a composite handle yet, only steel, fg, and wood. I saw yours. I did not know what a caprock style was and had to read about it. I would need the point as our clay packs after a few rains. In the garden, with lots of organic material, that round shovel would do it. Elsewhere though I could stand on it and it would not penetrate from mid summer until the rains of November start up our wet season.
I just used mine to dig up roots in ground that was frozen solid. Standing on it was necessary as I worked it into the frozen soil. I have not found the lack of a point to be an issue. Mine is very sharp and goes into the ground easily.
 

Dirtmechanic

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I just used mine to dig up roots in ground that was frozen solid. Standing on it was necessary as I worked it into the frozen soil. I have not found the lack of a point to be an issue. Mine is very sharp and goes into the ground easily.
I will have to look into that shape more then because I am all about easier! Funny how a person can get stuck on things like the shape of a shovel!
 

SprigOfTheLivingDead

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I have not run across a composite handle yet, only steel, fg, and wood. I saw yours. I did not know what a caprock style was and had to read about it. I would need the point as our clay packs after a few rains. In the garden, with lots of organic material, that round shovel would do it. Elsewhere though I could stand on it and it would not penetrate from mid summer until the rains of November start up our wet season.
Maybe this? https://www.amleo.com/leonard-full-...straight-handle-and-rubber-foot-pad/p/AMP13DL
 

catjac1975

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Okay so it was cheap. And the handle was not that dense. But oh-boy was it lightweight! And it had a wonderfully sharp tip, unlike methusalah in the shed, which is really a perfect shovel, but literally the tip has worn away until every time I look at it I subconciously start wanting some french fries from the big M.

The broken one was too flexible, not just in the handle, but the metal. I was working harder without leverage, so it all went away.

So for that one special tool we dirt diggers all hate to love, which one would you get - IF you were spending my money?
I bought the Spear Head shovel from the manufacturer at the Boston Flower SHow some years back. I thought we had enough shovels, but my husband had to have it. Best shovel ever. The handle broke and they sent me another one for free. The new handles are unbreakable. Cuts like budda.

51pQCBIaiTL.jpeg
 

flowerbug

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I have not run across a composite handle yet, only steel, fg, and wood. I saw yours. I did not know what a caprock style was and had to read about it. I would need the point as our clay packs after a few rains. In the garden, with lots of organic material, that round shovel would do it. Elsewhere though I could stand on it and it would not penetrate from mid summer until the rains of November start up our wet season.

yes, i have had some times of digging where i have to jump up into the air and come down on the shovel to get it to go a few cm further into the clay. what really helps is just making sure the area gets watered for a few days before digging.

i'm really glad now that most of my deep trenching is done. i hope. :)

low till, no till is my huge preference.
 

Artichoke Lover

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I almost always have to jump on a shovel to get it into the ground. I don’t weigh enough to drive it into the soil any other way. I might have to look at the one catjac linked. It looks like it might be easier to use for me.
 

Zeedman

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Artichoke Lover

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Looks like a nice shovel, but ouch! Sticker shock! Regardless of quality, I'm not sure I could talk myself into that one, even if DW wasn't trying to talk me out of it (which she would).

That spear head shovel looks like a nice compromise between deep penetration & digging, at a reasonable price... DW would probably love the short-handled version.
Considering the price and the bulk order option it looks like a professional quality shovel. Those are built to take a lot of abuse. I would expect a well cared for one to last a minimum of about 15-20 years for an average gardener. We have 2 that I think have composite handles that came from my uncle who does landscaping. I’ll admit we take very poor care of our gardening tools (I’m getting better about it slowly) and these have lasted at least 7 years and are still in very good condition. A regular wooden handled shovel only lasts us around 2 years in comparison.
 
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