Can anyone identify this mystery plant?

SPedigrees

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This sprang up in an unmowed area and I'm wondering what it is and where it came from. I believe it is some sort of rose, but I didn't notice it blooming this summer. It has thorns, rose-like foliage, and now has developed clusters of what look like rose hips.
MysteryPlant8Oct2023a.JPG

MysteryPlant8Oct2023b.JPG

MysteryPlant8Oct2023c.JPG
 

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digitS'

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I looked at the Lady Bird Johnson Rosa this&that but only came up with a couple of natives to the West that look like that but, don't you think, the odd number of leaves, their shape, and the thorns suggest the rose family?

And This Reminds me,

I need to gain some understanding of what I could use rose hips for other than tea. (I didn't care for them that way.) There is the oldest wild rose just a few feet from the big veggie garden. I say old but it has a trunk the size of my leg! And, it was covered with shriveled hips when I went over to look at it this Spring. Use has to be a simple one -- you know how I am ;).

Steve
 

SPedigrees

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I'd thought at first that it might be a blackberry bramble, but it seems to resemble blackberries less and less the larger it grows. (Of course blackberries and roses are in the same family group.) It had to have produced flowers to have all these rose hips, but I never noticed them.

I have only two types of roses on my property. The first are rugosa roses, but mystery plant is definitely not that. And the second is this climbing rose that has bloomed only twice in the 6 or 7 years I've had it. I don't know its name, but it does look similar to mystery plant. I guess the next logical step is to take cuttings of both plants and compare the foliage. It looked like this in 2020 but hasn't bloomed since.
TrellisRosesAndKiwiVine7Jul2020Crop.JPG
 

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I need to gain some understanding of what I could use rose hips for other than tea. (I didn't care for them that way.) There is the oldest wild rose just a few feet from the big veggie garden. I say old but it has a trunk the size of my leg! And, it was covered with shriveled hips when I went over to look at it this Spring. Use has to be a simple one -- you know how I am ;).

Steve
Years ago friends of ours gave us a couple jars of rose hip jelly or jam that one of their relatives had made. They seemed glad to unload some, as this relative had gifted them with quite a large supply. I think we ate the first jar (on toast and muffins) but never finished the second jar. There was something about it...its bland taste perhaps. At first it tasted very good, but then we tired of it quickly. Perhaps if these preserves had been mixed with another type of more flavourful fruit or berries, it would have had more taste appeal.

That is the only use of rose hips I have first hand knowledge of but this girl who lives in my state (off the grid) offers suggestions of various ways o use them, including wine and mead, and medicinal concoctions.
https://practicalselfreliance.com/?s=rose+hip
On edit at closer inspection, I was wrong about wine/mead. She makes those beverages from rose petals, not rose hips.
 

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If the plant is very close to your two roses, it might be the suckers growing from the rootstock (I heard that Dr. Huey is one of the common varieties that are used as rose rootstocks in US). Or it might be a volunteer rose brought by the wildlife, my guess.
 

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I don’t know what the mystery plant is but those are not rose hips. We’ve had them flourishing around the woody edges of properties in the Dakotas and here in Alaska. The thing they are most noted for is a high concentration of vitamin c. Pre frost they aren’t all that tasty but that improves once they’ve seen a frost or two. Once it gets light and i go down to do rabbit chores i’ll take some pictures of “rose hips”.

Rose hip jelly is ok but like most jellies, it’s just another way to eat sugar, which we don’t!
 

Alasgun

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I don’t know what the mystery plant is but those are not rose hips. We’ve had them flourishing around the woody edges of properties in the Dakotas and here in Alaska. The thing they are most noted for is a high concentration of vitamin c. Pre frost they aren’t all that tasty but that improves once they’ve seen a frost or two. Once it gets light and i go down to do rabbit chores i’ll take some pictures of “rose hips”.

Rose hip jelly is ok but like most jellies, it’s just another way to eat sugar, which we don’t!
Here’s some hips; you have to imagine leaves as they are long gone. Some years are better than others, this was a very poor year for them. The rabbits like the stems/leaves when green.

Also known as “rose apples”, and the thorns are not nearly as fierce as what you have.

* I have to apologize for being somewhat bull headed about the rosehips! A little googling shows rosehips being common to ALL types of roses. In my very small botanical circle the conversations are centered around wild roses.
 

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SPedigrees

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If the plant is very close to your two roses, it might be the suckers growing from the rootstock (I heard that Dr. Huey is one of the common varieties that are used as rose rootstocks in US). Or it might be a volunteer rose brought by the wildlife, my guess.
Good guesses both, Phaedra, but this volunteer rose is in a remote area, I'd estimate probably about 250 feet (76 meters) from the rose growing next to my house. However, upon reflection I have dredged up a vague memory of picking and scattering rose hips in this area, both from my rugosa roses and from the climbing roses next to my house. So I'm thinking now that I'm the wildlife (lol), as opposed to birds.

Anyway I'm next to certain that the "mystery plant" is indeed the offspring of my climbing roses. In these photos, the foliage from my rose is on the right, and a snippet from its feral counterpart with the more bug-eaten and tattered foliage is on the left. Both have fearsome thorns (I bear the scars!) and leaves that look identical to me. What do you all think?

2RoseComparison.JPG

2_Roses.JPG


I looked back through my receipts and see that I bought 3 of these cold weather climbing roses back in 2014. This is all the info (below) that came from the online seller who was retiring from the business that same year. These roses bloomed in 2019 and again in 2020. Then I had to cut them back severely to make room for installation of propane tanks and a generator, and they haven't bloomed since, but hopefully will bounce back. Probably both they, and their offspring/clone up on the hill in back, could use some fertilizer.

Roses2014.jpg
 

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