Ducks4you 2021 Ragtag Thread

Ridgerunner

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I'm very curious to know what does Dandelion Jelly taste like?
I got the recipe from @baymule What do you think Bay, honey?

I've never heard of Mimosa
Mimosa is a drink you make with orange juice and champagne. My wife and I were volunteering at a charity thrift shop, sorting and pricing the book section and spent some time on the cash registers. A booklet came through that had all kinds of canning recipes so I grabbed it, after paying an appropriate price of course. That's where the mimosa and margarita jelly recipes came from.

Purple Hull Jelly
Purple Hull is a variety of black eyed peas. You can tell the peas are ready to eat because the pea hulls turn purple. I'd boil the hulls for a bit and strain that to get a liquid to make jelly. It had a grape flavor.

At one time, I was an inveterate chutney maker. Date and raisin, coconut & coriander, spiced plum, tamarind. I dabbled with tomato chutney. I'm curious to know what kind you've got there.

Probably peach and plum, those were my staples for chutney. I'd occasionally try some other ingredients. One year I tried adding some native persimmon with the peach and plum, did not work at all. I had a basic chutney recipe for other ingredients and proportions but I as not fixed on only using certain fruits. Within limits I experimented.

What a wonderful skill to be able to do this. Dreams.
As you can probably tell I'm not intimidated by making jelly or jam. I just learned the basics and had fun. The main risk is that it fails to set. But that is not a failure, you now have syrup for pancakes or waffles. It helped that I grew a lot of different fruits and berries to play with. If the grandkids had been close by that place was about perfect for me. Lots of work but lots of fun. But grandkids rule.
 

flowerbug

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one thing i really like which is more in the spread/chutney realm (but it is savory with a few other things that add some sweet notes) is called a garlic pickle. it's really mostly fried garlic with onions, dates, golden raisins and then spices too (roasted mustard and fenugreek) and a bit of salt. really good on toast, but we'd often just eat it right from the jar. don't let the name fool you, it wasn't pickled in the sense that most USoAians would think. it's just the Indian (as in country) version of the name they have for many things like chutneys or spreads.

since i was looking i'll post the recipe here:

this is the recipe i started with and then added on (see notes below):

sadly this link no longer works and i have no idea what the strange symbol means now, but it is probably something like 1/2 or 1/4 or so...


> http://www.daawat.com/recipes/contributions/garlicpickle.htm
>
> Ingredients:
>
> Garlic - 3 cups
> Oil - 5 Table spoons
> Chili Powder - 3 Tea Spoons
> Lemon Juice - 6 tea Spoons
> Salt - As Per Taste
> Mustard Seeds _ 2 Tea Spoons
> Fenugreek Seeds - 1 Tea Spoon
> Turmeric - � Spoon
>
>
> Garlic Pickle
>
>
> Method:
> 1. Fry Garlic in the oil till
> golden brown.
> 2. Fry Mustard and fenugreek
> seeds dry and grind them
> together.
> 3. Mix the salt, chili,
> turmeric and the mustard
> and fenugreek powder with
> the fried garlic.
> 4. After the garlic comes to
> the room temperature mix
> the lemon juice.
> 5. This pickle will stay fresh
> for a month.
> Preparation time: 20
> minutes
>

my additions, i added onion and
the juice of one lemon and lime instead
of just the lemon. plus some coriander,
red chili pepper flakes, green chili
paste (not too much, but enough to
get another dimension to the heat),
cardamom, pineapple pieces, chopped
dates, golden raisins,

all of the fruit was simmered for
a while and then i added the dry
spices to that to get them hydrated.

my method went differently too.
i first did the mustard and fenugreek
in the pan and then ground them before
frying the garlic. i set the garlic
aside once golden and fried the onions
to caramelize them a little, then put
them with the garlic until the rest of
the mix was ready, then i added the
garlic and onions back to the spice
and fruit mix and adjusted salt and
sugar to taste before filling the jars
and canning them.
 
Last edited:

baymule

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I got the recipe from @baymule What do you think Bay, honey?
Yes, a light honey taste. I also picked the flowers and let them air dry for dandelion tea. I grew them in my garden at our old house in Livingston. I get a few here, but the sheep love them and usually get to them first. LOL I picked bags of seed and scattered them here when we moved. I love their bright, cheery yellow color.
 

digitS'

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That's Lots and Lots of tomatoes this year, Ducks'!

We have 16 quarts of pasta sauce in the freezer and some more tomatoes waiting in the kitchen. The sauce is cooked down 👇 but it also has additions ☝️.

Didn't bring any green tomatoes home on the last harvest visit. Not much reason too ... prefer eggplant to green tomatoes fried and have some of those in fridge, don't need any more sauce, and didn't grow the best "keeper" (Thessaloniki) this year. The larger tomatoes were so late showing up, it kinda piled the sauce making all in the last couple of weeks.

Steve
 

heirloomgal

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one thing i really like which is more in the spread/chutney realm (but it is savory with a few other things that add some sweet notes) is called a garlic pickle. it's really mostly fried garlic with onions, dates, golden raisins and then spices too (roasted mustard and fenugreek) and a bit of salt. really good on toast, but we'd often just eat it right from the jar. don't let the name fool you, it wasn't pickled in the sense that most USoAians would think. it's just the Indian (as in country) version of the name they have for many things like chutneys or spreads.

since i was looking i'll post the recipe here:

this is the recipe i started with and then added on (see notes below):

sadly this link no longer works and i have no idea what the strange symbol means now, but it is probably something like 1/2 or 1/4 or so...


> http://www.daawat.com/recipes/contributions/garlicpickle.htm
>
> Ingredients:
>
> Garlic - 3 cups
> Oil - 5 Table spoons
> Chili Powder - 3 Tea Spoons
> Lemon Juice - 6 tea Spoons
> Salt - As Per Taste
> Mustard Seeds _ 2 Tea Spoons
> Fenugreek Seeds - 1 Tea Spoon
> Turmeric - � Spoon
>
>
> Garlic Pickle
>
>
> Method:
> 1. Fry Garlic in the oil till
> golden brown.
> 2. Fry Mustard and fenugreek
> seeds dry and grind them
> together.
> 3. Mix the salt, chili,
> turmeric and the mustard
> and fenugreek powder with
> the fried garlic.
> 4. After the garlic comes to
> the room temperature mix
> the lemon juice.
> 5. This pickle will stay fresh
> for a month.
> Preparation time: 20
> minutes
>

my additions, i added onion and
the juice of one lemon and lime instead
of just the lemon. plus some coriander,
red chili pepper flakes, green chili
paste (not too much, but enough to
get another dimension to the heat),
cardamom, pineapple pieces, chopped
dates, golden raisins,

all of the fruit was simmered for
a while and then i added the dry
spices to that to get them hydrated.

my method went differently too.
i first did the mustard and fenugreek
in the pan and then ground them before
frying the garlic. i set the garlic
aside once golden and fried the onions
to caramelize them a little, then put
them with the garlic until the rest of
the mix was ready, then i added the
garlic and onions back to the spice
and fruit mix and adjusted salt and
sugar to taste before filling the jars
and canning them.
3 cups of garlic!! Wow! But I don't think I've ever met an Indian pickle or chutney I didn't eventually learn to like, even the stinky mango pickles or the lemon ones. I'd probably love this recipe. I've not tried chutneys or pickles on toast, I've only ever eaten them with rice along with the meal.

Sounds like you enjoy the cuisine of Bharata @flowerbug!
 

heirloomgal

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13 quarts of tomatoes and 3 1/2 quarts of juice on Wednesday. Biggest tomato harvest for me, EVER!!
Also, 2 1/2 quarts of now frozen, okra. Thought the okra was spent, but it is now approaching 9 ft tall and STILL flowering. Nobody sent them a memo about a frost coming up.
9 feet! Holy mackerel, it must get hot in your area?
 

heirloomgal

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Purple Hull is a variety of black eyed peas. You can tell the peas are ready to eat because the pea hulls turn purple. I'd boil the hulls for a bit and strain that to get a liquid to make jelly. It had a grape flavor.
Until reading this, I had no idea that any part of a bean (or, black eyed pea I guess) could be used for any sweet purposes. The bean hulls taste like grape jelly! I wouldn't have guessed it, nor that dandelions could taste good in any preparation. I wonder if growing them in a more southern location makes them taste better.

Sorry for hijacking your post @ducks4you !
:hide
 

flowerbug

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3 cups of garlic!! Wow! But I don't think I've ever met an Indian pickle or chutney I didn't eventually learn to like, even the stinky mango pickles or the lemon ones. I'd probably love this recipe. I've not tried chutneys or pickles on toast, I've only ever eaten them with rice along with the meal.

Sounds like you enjoy the cuisine of Bharata @flowerbug!

i don't really go by region when cooking or learning recipes. usually a friend and i would try a new place to eat and like some of the dishes and then i'd try to figure them out myself for my own cooking.


the first time i had garlic pickle it was straight from the jar like this:

 
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