Favorite Chili Pepper

ninnymary

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My son, the chef was given a 4" pot rocoto pepper by a vender at the farmer's market. Well that plant grew huge and I had to keep it pruned to a 3ft wide plant. Produced tons of peppers that were of course super hot! It grew year round and produced peppers even in winter. I finally transplanted it to a huge pot but it got water logged during our rains and died.

Someone gave me another 4" pot rocoto and it's in my raised bed. What was I thinking? Now I have no where to plant it.

Mary
 

flowerbug

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My son, the chef was given a 4" pot rocoto pepper by a vender at the farmer's market. Well that plant grew huge and I had to keep it pruned to a 3ft wide plant. Produced tons of peppers that were of course super hot! It grew year round and produced peppers even in winter. I finally transplanted it to a huge pot but it got water logged during our rains and died.

Someone gave me another 4" pot rocoto and it's in my raised bed. What was I thinking? Now I have no where to plant it.

Mary

can't you prune it like a bonzai? :) severely, make it thin and fit it where you want it IMO.
 

valley ranch

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Hey everyone, I'm looking for a good mild chili pepper to grow for canning diced tomatoes and chilis. We buy so many from the store, and it seems silly to buy something I know I can grow myself. The problem is my tongue does not love being burnt to a crisp, and many of the peppers I grow are for my husband. :somad <-- my mouth looks like this after a Habanero, to say nothing of the spicier ones!


Hi, There is a pepper I like, and assuming you mean to put one or two or ~ in with the vegs you are canning ~ that pepper is: Cascabel or Cascabella the pointed ~ they have a fine taste I really like and are good pickled ~ in any case they can be picked when green, yellow or RED ~ of course the yellow are less hot that the RED

Most of the more popular peppers are not to my liking I like Tabasco as well ~ not sure these two would be chili peppers, maybe

Mom and I, when we would be working on the rentals, would stop at the Pastrami Stands, the yellow ones ~ they had these great Kaiser Rolls the bottom of which were piled with thinly sliced Pastrami, the top was dipped in Au Jus ~ there were boles of pickled, Yellow Cascabellas ~ Shad Lav e ```
 

Zeedman

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*Which may or may not be pure. Some of these pepper have the normal black seeds, but some have seeds that are dirty tan, which might indicate being some sort of hybrid that is more day length neutral.
Or perhaps the tannish seeds are from peppers picked immature & allowed to ripen off-plant over time? Although given the purportedly large yield of the plants (bushes) they might be economically feasible for greenhouse culture, provided there is a market for them locally.

I've always wanted to grow a Rocoto or Manzano pepper... their flavor sounds intriguing, and I prefer thick-walled hot peppers. Rocotos may be a little hotter than my preferred range though - somewhere between the hottest jalapenos, and the milder habaneros. I'd like to taste-test a Rocoto, but no one locally sells them, and at the nearest ethnic market (about 90 minutes drive) I've only seen Manzanos.
 

Zeedman

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Zeedman, I will try to remember to send you a couple to taste.

Mary
Thank you for the offer, @ninnymary , I'll be looking forward to it. One of the joys of life is trying new things. Or maybe I should say, one of the challenges of life is to try new things... hopefully this doesn't turn into one of those "be careful what you wish for" moments. :lol:
 
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henless

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My son (who is a chef) and always requests that I plant a couple things for him just got me 3 packages of seeds. One of them is Habanada. It has the flavor of a habanero but without the heat. I can't wait to plant it next year.

I grew Habanadas last year. They did really well here. Some were taller than my cattle panels, very bushy and loaded down. They kept producing till frost. I don't know what habaneros taste like, but these had a citrusy flavor. They were just small. They take a while to process.
 
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