Fixing soil

Jane23

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The door is a little sad. I used a grinder to cut it out. I added rubber tubing around the edges to prevent myself from slicing myself up on sharp edges. I think it is too small, but I can add stuff next to it, let it break down for a minute, then add it to the tank later. At least those plants I will not be immediately digging into the garden. I know it will take years, but I hope to have usable soil eventually. At least it is not hardpan clay, so I know it can have good nutrients; it will just take a while to work with it,

The last time I turned the soil, I noticed a lot of the clay had sunk to the bottom, so the top layers are better. Pine needles, straw, compost, and time will be the tools I need now.
The snow finally melted a bit. It is supposed to come back tomorrow. Here is a picture of my compost bin. It is small, but it works. There is a large piece of rubber inside the tank, keeping anything from falling out in case you wonder about the door not completely closing.
 

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Dirtmechanic

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The snow finally melted a bit. It is supposed to come back tomorrow. Here is a picture of my compost bin. It is small, but it works. There is a large piece of rubber inside the tank, keeping anything from falling out in case you wonder about the door not completely closing.

Without the rubber bits that is a great setup to pasteurize compost with a fire. I did not realize how many pathogenic fungi and other beasties were hosted by the plants and grasses around my garden at first. It took a while for me to learn the hard way.
 
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Jane23

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Without the rubber bits that is a great setup to pasteurize compost with a fire.
The rubber bits come off sadly very easily. So, should I clear the area of brush and move it away from the tree and start a small fire under it? It would cook it nicely. It's perfect for the hot summers.
 

Marie2020

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it certainly has here for some plants i've grown. one season i had green peppers that would not produce much but their neighbors the red peppers put on a huge crop in comparison. only difference was that i'd amended that whole row with worm compost.

as of yet i've never seen squash/melons or tomatoes get upset at how much worm compost i put under them. on the other hand i've had bean plants rot when planted in too much worm compost

(then the next year what gets planted in that same spot does much better).
I was always told too never plant the same plants in the same area 🤔 now I'm confused 😕 again
 

Marie2020

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The rubber bits come off sadly very easily. So, should I clear the area of brush and move it away from the tree and start a small fire under it? It would cook it nicely. It's perfect for the hot summers.
It's the chemicals in the rubber that bothers me
 

Marie2020

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crop rotations are usually a good thing, but if you don't see any problems being caused by it a few years in a row of the same annual crop may be ok.
I'll only be attempting my raised bed , if I can keep the chickens out if it. Then there's a little patch of ground where my pet chickens are buried that's near my compost bin that I'm thinking of. In saying that I'll have to work on keeping the slugs caterpillars away. They are the worst problem around here
 

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