Gardening Intervention

baymule

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hosspak

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@hosspak you can toss tomatoes in a zip lock and put them in the freezer until you get enough to process.

Pickle recipe? Here's my great grandmother's recipe that I always make. They are sweet, spicy and crunchy. The cinnamon pickles are from my grandmother. They are awesome! Now let me go look for that thread and post the link.......

Found it!

http://www.theeasygarden.com/thread...r-yall-that-are-tired-of-soggy-pickles.12510/
Thank you, thank you, thank you... I want to try the cinnamon pickles.... Question, have you tried putting the rinsed slices into the jars and just pouring the hot brine into the jars to get more crunchyness? Then process.....Have you used pickle crisp?
 

so lucky

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@hosspak, I have read that putting a grape leaf in each jar as you pack them will keep the pickles crunchy. You may have to harvest the grape leaves when you get an opportunity, and stick them in the freezer till you need them for pickles.
 

baymule

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Thank you, thank you, thank you... I want to try the cinnamon pickles.... Question, have you tried putting the rinsed slices into the jars and just pouring the hot brine into the jars to get more crunchyness? Then process.....Have you used pickle crisp?
These pickles will be crunchy, trust me on this one. Simmer them in the syrup until translucent, pack in hot jars and pour hot syrup over them. I love these on hamburgers! Or just out of the jar, in deviled eggs, potato salad..... I have never used pickle crisp, the lime in these 2 recipes make it crisp.
 

hosspak

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I was looking at my broccoli plants today and they look really big and ready. So I thought I had better do some homework as this is our first time planting broccoli. So here is some tips that I found.

How To Harvest Broccoli – When To Pick Broccoli
By Heather Rhoades

Growing and harvesting broccoli is one of the more rewarding moments in the vegetable garden. If you were able to baby your broccoli through the hot weather and kept it from bolting [1], you are now looking at several well formed heads of broccoli. You may be asking yourself when to pick broccoli. What are the signs that broccoli is ready to harvest? Read on for more information on how to harvest broccoli.

Signs That Broccoli is Ready to Harvest
Broccoli planting [2] and harvesting is sometimes a bit tricky, but there are a few signs you can look for that will tell you if your broccoli is ready to be harvested.

Has a Head - The first sign as to when to harvest broccoli is the most obvious. You have to have the initial head. The head should be firm and tight.

Head Size - The broccoli head typically will get to be 4 to 7 inches wide when it is time to harvest broccoli. But do not go on size alone. Size is an indicator, but be sure to look at the other signs as well.

Floret Size – The size of the individual florets or flower buds are the most reliable indicator. When the florets on the outside edge of the head get to be the size of the head of a match, then you can start harvesting broccoli from that plant.

Color - When looking for signs of when to pick broccoli, pay close attention to the color of the florets. They should be a deep green. If you see even a hint of yellow, the florets are starting to bloom or bolt. Harvest the broccoli immediately if this happens.

How to Harvest Broccoli
When your broccoli head is ready to harvest, use a sharp knife and cut the head of the broccoli off the plant. You should cut the broccoli head stem 5 inches or more below the head. Cut the head off with a swift cut. Try to avoid sawing at the stem as this could cause unnecessary damage to the plant and ruin your chances for side harvesting later.

After you have harvested the main head, you can continue to harvest the side shoots from the broccoli. These will grow like tiny heads to the side of where the main head was. By looking at the size of the florets, you can tell when these side shoots are ready for harvest. Simply cut them off as they become ready.

Now that you know how to harvest broccoli, you can cut the heads off your broccoli with confidence. Proper broccoli planting and harvesting can put this tasty and nutritious vegetable on your table straight out of your garden.
 

Carol Dee

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@hosspak Thanks for posting the broccoli tips. I failed to harvest mine in time. Went to flower very quickly. (I was waiting or them to get bigger.) They where only a 3 inches then got to the 6-7 inch size fast and bolted! I will pick them smaller if they look ready. Someone on here told me to go ahead and pick the heads and they should set side shoots with heads. I did that about Tuesday and already see some beginning to form, Yeah, we may get some yet. :)
 

hosspak

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Since the gopher took out the zukes and is chasing down the carrots. I have 2 beds that need a fall replanting... What are some good fall veggies for the heat in So. Cal.
 

TheSeedObsesser

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....Garbanzos? They're a cool weather crop that can take more heat than most other cool weather crops. I'd buy seed from a seed company rather than using generic storebought garbanzos.

When do you usually get your first frost? If it's fairly late you might be able to get away with some short season warm weather crops.

Good luck with your gopher problem!
 

baymule

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In the winter I grow cole crops, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and I grow greens-collard, mustard and turnips. I buy onion sets at the feed store for green onions all winter.
 
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