Garlic

Gardening with Rabbits

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I cooked some of my garlic last night and I was wondering what nutrition is in roasted garlic and what is a serving size. A quarter of a cup. How much roasted garlic do you eat at one time and how much raw garlic do you eat at one time? I could eat about all the roasted garlic put in front of me, but I am wondering what is normal. Could you or would you eat a whole roasted garlic bulb? I am trying to decide how much to plant next year and get the spot read. I did not plant as much as last year, but now DD is drooling over my garlic. This purple garlic is I think $13 a pound at one of the stores in town.
 

flowerbug

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we don't roast garlic here for eating apart from what we're cooking, like we'll slice it or dice it and put it in with a pork loin or put it in sauces and such.

the last time i used garlic was to make hummus, and i used a whole small bulb for that. yes, it's a bit potent, but Mom won't eat it anyways... :) no worries about vampires visiting... i made it a batch and a half so the final result came to a bit more than a quart using three cans of chick peas so the rough proportions were about 1 can of chick peas to about 1/3 a small bulb of garlic. for some people that would be way too much raw garlic, for me it is enough. i don't roast it, just gets ground up with the hand mixer in the mayo, olive oil, lemon juice before i add it to the ground up chick peas.

i've never looked up the nutrition profile of garlic or the serving size. so let's see what the google comes up with.

first site:

3 grams of garlic is 4.5 calories and 1 gram of carbs, not much fiber but trace amounts of a lot of other things. hmm, 0.2 grams protien, 1 gram of carbs

"
If you have a bleeding disorder or are taking blood-thinning medications, talk to your doctor before increasing your garlic intake.
"


hmm, not sure i consider those all "proven", but okeeey...


here is a better nutrition profile, but for an entire cup of garlic: eek! :)

 

digitS'

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Could you or would you eat a whole roasted garlic bulb?
Since you asked ;)

No. We use so little that I neglected to grow it for years. Bought it so that it is always on hand. And, began growing garlic again about 3 years ago. It does well here but I have to use backyard space to avoid the tractor guy.

Shallots - never seem to have enough! Onions are essential and they did well in 2020. I'm also pleased that there are lots of Leeks :).

An example of difference in onion/garlic use: Fill a 5 quart pot with pasta sauce ingredients. Start with 1 large onion bulb and 2 cloves of garlic sauteed. Cook down to something over 3 quart of sauce.

Steve ;)
 

Ridgerunner

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My wife can't eat much garlic. We can use it for a little flavoring but too much is not good for her. So we are limited in that.

One of the Brennan restaurants in New Orleans used to roast garlic until it was mushy and set that on the table as an appetizer while you were waiting on your order. You'd use that instead of butter on your bread. I don't know what kinds of herbs or spices the may have used to roast it but man it was good.
 

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we don't roast garlic here for eating apart from what we're cooking, like we'll slice it or dice it and put it in with a pork loin or put it in sauces and such.

the last time i used garlic was to make hummus, and i used a whole small bulb for that. yes, it's a bit potent, but Mom won't eat it anyways... :) no worries about vampires visiting... i made it a batch and a half so the final result came to a bit more than a quart using three cans of chick peas so the rough proportions were about 1 can of chick peas to about 1/3 a small bulb of garlic. for some people that would be way too much raw garlic, for me it is enough. i don't roast it, just gets ground up with the hand mixer in the mayo, olive oil, lemon juice before i add it to the ground up chick peas.

i've never looked up the nutrition profile of garlic or the serving size. so let's see what the google comes up with.

first site:

3 grams of garlic is 4.5 calories and 1 gram of carbs, not much fiber but trace amounts of a lot of other things. hmm, 0.2 grams protien, 1 gram of carbs

"
If you have a bleeding disorder or are taking blood-thinning medications, talk to your doctor before increasing your garlic intake.
"


hmm, not sure i consider those all "proven", but okeeey...


here is a better nutrition profile, but for an entire cup of garlic: eek! :)

I do use garlic raw but only on my on food. DH and DS could not eat much raw garlic and DH even cooked garlic if he ate much messed him up. I am on a baby aspirin so I guess I better be careful. I am not sure roasted would be as strong as raw.
 

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Since you asked ;)

No. We use so little that I neglected to grow it for years. Bought it so that it is always on hand. And, began growing garlic again about 3 years ago. It does well here but I have to use backyard space to avoid the tractor guy.

Shallots - never seem to have enough! Onions are essential and they did well in 2020. I'm also pleased that there are lots of Leeks :).

An example of difference in onion/garlic use: Fill a 5 quart pot with pasta sauce ingredients. Start with 1 large onion bulb and 2 cloves of garlic sauteed. Cook down to something over 3 quart of sauce.

Steve ;)
I like onions and shallots too. I should plan on planting shallots next year.
 

Gardening with Rabbits

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One of the Brennan restaurants in New Orleans used to roast garlic until it was mushy and set that on the table as an appetizer while you were waiting on your order. You'd use that instead of butter on your bread. I don't know what kinds of herbs or spices the may have used to roast it but man it was good.
Maybe you have the answer and people are roasting the garlic for butter and not just eating the cloves.
 

Marie2020

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Since you asked ;)

No. We use so little that I neglected to grow it for years. Bought it so that it is always on hand. And, began growing garlic again about 3 years ago. It does well here but I have to use backyard space to avoid the tractor guy.

Shallots - never seem to have enough! Onions are essential and they did well in 2020. I'm also pleased that there are lots of Leeks :).

An example of difference in onion/garlic use: Fill a 5 quart pot with pasta sauce ingredients. Start with 1 large onion bulb and 2 cloves of garlic sauteed. Cook down to something over 3 quart of sauce.

Steve ;)
Don't be mean, invite me to dinner :drool
 

Zeedman

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For the most part, other than keeping a few bulbs fresh for DW to use, I've always peeled, sliced, and dehydrated the majority of my garlic. Those "chips" can be added to any cooked dish (where they will keep their shape) or ground into fresh garlic powder. The only way I've ever eaten a large quantity of garlic is as garlic mashed potatoes. :drool BUT... having used whole garlic cloves in jars of pickles & eaten those, I think I could eat a lot of pickled garlic.

I am building a large raised bed to be used for garlic, and will be growing 8 varieties... plus an unknown from my previous collection which survived in one of DW's flower beds as a volunteer.
 
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