Grafting Tomatoes

MinnesotaGardening

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Never tried grafting tomatoes, but I remember someone on another forum questioning whether you could use the root stock of a closely related species. After perfecting the grafting technique with other tomatoes, it might be interesting to try litchi tomato as a root stock. It has an incredibly strong root system, a lot of disease tolerance, and might transfer some of its frost tolerance. Currant tomato might also be a good root stock. Might even try that myself, once I retire... it could be an interesting experiment.
Hmmm...I do have litchi tomato seeds too... 😏
 

flowerbug

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This spring I will be trying grafting tomatoes. I've never done it before and have a few questions. Also, if you have done it before and have some advice, I'm all ears. I usually get a surplus of a huge variety of wonderful tomatoes, but am very curious to see what kind of difference having a resistant rootstock can have on production. I have some slightly bothersome viral pests that I am looking to mitigate, which I normally deal with using appropriate pruning and watering. So really, this is just one more excuse to work closely with my beautiful seedlings! :woot

My questions so far:
1) Some rootstock varieties mention difficulty achieving balance (of what?) and being more vegetatively or fruiting inclined. Since I'm in a short season, should I go for a rootstock that puts less emphasis on vegetative growth?
2) Does anyone who has grafted have any recommendations about what worked best for them? (I realize the virus/issue you are dealing with makes a difference.)
3) Do I really need to buy a fancy propagation chamber, or can I MacGyver it?
4) Does the seed source for the rootstock matter in your experience for a hybrid? Some websites are much cheaper than, for example, Johnnys.
*makes popcorn* :) never done, interested and will read along. :)
 

catjac1975

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If she hasn't drifted off, @catjac1975 showed an interest in trying this in 2012 (LINK). @baymule and @so lucky , too! I'd think that they would have told us about it if they did try. Maybe you can recruit them as partners ;).

@Greenthumb18 made that dream move from a northern clime to a warmer place and out in the country. He must have become very busy with his acreage after that and stopped posting.

I remember @Greensage45 from waaay back and it seemed that he did things like this. He was in southern New Mexico but liked propagating in his winter greenhouse. One day, he was rather flippant with another gardener and a TEG moderator, who is also not around now, jumped on him. He was so upset that he went back and deleted much of what he had posted.

Johnny's sells grafting supplies.

The grafting may be above most of our experiences but there are some who do cloning. @valley ranch, for one.

Steve
off to prep some soil for dropping some tomato and eggplant seed today :D
I never tried it. I think it would be quite easy. I saw them for sale annd I thought it would be fun to do. But, really. How many more tomatoes do I need?
 

digitS'

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My suggestion is to watch a lot of U-tube and see what the professions do.
The links that @catjac1975 had on that 2012 thread may be of help.

After perfecting the grafting technique with other tomatoes, it might be interesting to try litchi tomato as a root stock.
And, why wouldn't datura work? Kidding!

Steve
 

YourRabbitGirl

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This spring I will be trying grafting tomatoes. I've never done it before and have a few questions. Also, if you have done it before and have some advice, I'm all ears. I usually get a surplus of a huge variety of wonderful tomatoes, but am very curious to see what kind of difference having a resistant rootstock can have on production. I have some slightly bothersome viral pests that I am looking to mitigate, which I normally deal with using appropriate pruning and watering. So really, this is just one more excuse to work closely with my beautiful seedlings! :woot

My questions so far:
1) Some rootstock varieties mention difficulty achieving balance (of what?) and being more vegetatively or fruiting inclined. Since I'm in a short season, should I go for a rootstock that puts less emphasis on vegetative growth?
2) Does anyone who has grafted have any recommendations about what worked best for them? (I realize the virus/issue you are dealing with makes a difference.)
3) Do I really need to buy a fancy propagation chamber, or can I MacGyver it?
4) Does the seed source for the rootstock matter in your experience for a hybrid? Some websites are much cheaper than, for example, Johnnys.
I haven't really tried grafting before. It's always a bit risky for me. Do you have any Instructions with videos or a much better illustration?
 

YourRabbitGirl

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Hmmm...I do have litchi tomato seeds too... 😏
Externally, grafted plants are better too. In fact, the grafted tomatoes are too vigorous to develop bags, the roots just don't have enough space. That's why we normally don't do this.
 
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