Greeting from Northern Michigan

Northern Gnome

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Hello from the north. I am a novice gardener with high aspirations looking to become self sustainable for the most part. I dabble in herbs, have had some success with vegetable gardens but am in a new planting zone now so success is hit or miss. I have no idea about technical things like soil type, pH and how to add this or that other than horse and chicken manure, dirt and water.
My ideal garden includes perennials for cutting, as much veggies as I can manage and a winter squash area.
I am in planting zone 4a according to gps mapping. My ground is excellent at producing boulders, wild raspberry, white pine and balsam fir in over-abundance. So, working with my land rather against it, DH and I are in the early stages of tree farming. I will also add an orchard for personal use (and I love the beauty of cherry blossoms!!)
Anyway, I look forward to learning from others here. I’m sure I will have lots of questions.
😊
 

ducks4you

Garden Master
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East Central IL, Was Zone 6, Now...maybe Zone 5
:welcome from Central IL. We have many members from around your neck of the woods.
Thanks for putting your location bc I will forget where you live after your start posting.
Look up Eliot Coleman. He created his Four Seasons Farm on 4 acres, zone 5, Maine, and had to clear a timber forest to create it.
 

Branching Out

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Southwestern B.C.
Hello from the north. I am a novice gardener with high aspirations looking to become self sustainable for the most part. I dabble in herbs, have had some success with vegetable gardens but am in a new planting zone now so success is hit or miss. I have no idea about technical things like soil type, pH and how to add this or that other than horse and chicken manure, dirt and water.
My ideal garden includes perennials for cutting, as much veggies as I can manage and a winter squash area.
I am in planting zone 4a according to gps mapping. My ground is excellent at producing boulders, wild raspberry, white pine and balsam fir in over-abundance. So, working with my land rather against it, DH and I are in the early stages of tree farming. I will also add an orchard for personal use (and I love the beauty of cherry blossoms!!)
Anyway, I look forward to learning from others here. I’m sure I will have lots of questions.
😊
It sounds like you are starting your own 'Biggest Little Farm'. That is very cool.
 

Dahlia

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Pacific Northwest
Hello from the north. I am a novice gardener with high aspirations looking to become self sustainable for the most part. I dabble in herbs, have had some success with vegetable gardens but am in a new planting zone now so success is hit or miss. I have no idea about technical things like soil type, pH and how to add this or that other than horse and chicken manure, dirt and water.
My ideal garden includes perennials for cutting, as much veggies as I can manage and a winter squash area.
I am in planting zone 4a according to gps mapping. My ground is excellent at producing boulders, wild raspberry, white pine and balsam fir in over-abundance. So, working with my land rather against it, DH and I are in the early stages of tree farming. I will also add an orchard for personal use (and I love the beauty of cherry blossoms!!)
Anyway, I look forward to learning from others here. I’m sure I will have lots of questions.
😊
Welcome from the Pacific Northwest! I think you will learn a lot from the lovely folks on this forum!
 

flowerbug

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hello and welcome to TEG from mid-Michigan (yes, i'm now a troll again <-- living under the bridge)...

the UP is a very large area and many different types of microclimates (like the southern coast along Lake Michigan or Lake Huron is going to be quite different from the tip of the Keweenaw Peninsula) or many many places in between. i'm familiar with it up there (i lived in Houghton-Hancock for 15 years and spent a lot of time wandering around other parts too as i liked to fish and hike).

so i guess the only thing i can think of now is that the further you are inland the more likely it is to be harsher for temperature swings, plant hardy stock suitable to perhaps one or two zones lower for things you absolutely do not want to lose to cold damage. talking to others in your area for ideas of plants and varieties will help you a great deal. :)
 

baymule

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Trinity County Texas
Welcome from east Texas! You are on your way on your farm! Adventure! I have no advice on your climate, it’s hot here. We are getting the lower edge of a Siberian cold front for Christmas, so will have nights in the teens. But it will warm back up. Winter comes and goes, we have several cold spells, then spring in March.

We love pictures, feel free to post all you want.
 

Northern Gnome

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UP Michigan
:welcome from Central IL. We have many members from around your neck of the woods.
Thanks for putting your location bc I will forget where you live after your start posting.
Look up Eliot Coleman. He created his Four Seasons Farm on 4 acres, zone 5, Maine, and had to clear a timber forest to create it.
Great! Thanks for the tip :thumbsup
 

Northern Gnome

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UP Michigan
hello and welcome to TEG from mid-Michigan (yes, i'm now a troll again <-- living under the bridge)...

the UP is a very large area and many different types of microclimates (like the southern coast along Lake Michigan or Lake Huron is going to be quite different from the tip of the Keweenaw Peninsula) or many many places in between. i'm familiar with it up there (i lived in Houghton-Hancock for 15 years and spent a lot of time wandering around other parts too as i liked to fish and hike).

so i guess the only thing i can think of now is that the further you are inland the more likely it is to be harsher for temperature swings, plant hardy stock suitable to perhaps one or two zones lower for things you absolutely do not want to lose to cold damage. talking to others in your area for ideas of plants and varieties will help you a great deal. :)
Thank you. Small world..I, too lived in Keweenaw (Mohawk and Laurium), now in Republic/Michigamee area. The snow isn’t as deep but it’s colder for sure. Good idea to plant from zone 3 as zone 4 seems optimistic, especially with cherry trees.
 

flowerbug

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when you clear a spot in the woods for gardening you are creating habitat for deer and other grazing critters. fences will likely be a good investment for some areas, not cheap, but worth it over the longer haul.

one thing we don't have to contend with down here are moose. up there... dunno... in all my years up there i never saw one but wished to.
 

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