Greetings from Germany

P Suckling

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welcome to TEG from mid-Michigan. :)

beans you say? :)
Yes I am afraid so flowerbug. And have been rediscovering greasy beans big time. They are doing so much better here in the much brighter light and warmer summer weather in the South of Germany at 48.5 degrees N, than in Britain at 52 degrees N. What was a struggle in Britain, seems to work much better here. However, I found a number of crosses. Do greasies cross more easily than other beans?

Most beans grow more strongly too and I have had broken bean supports, that would have been entirely sufficient in Britain. Still need to work out a lot of how to do things best here. Pleased to meet fellow 'beanaholics'.
 

P Suckling

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Hi there, so you are in which state?

I also keep my tomatoes both in the hoop tunnel (main stems removed in early September, but the side shoots are kept for experiments) and outdoors (propagated from side shoots, also for experiments, too.).

The unusual warm weather is somehow funny, our Turkish poppies are growing again. They should enter their dormancy already. Our warm weather will only last for another two days, but it won't become too cold soon. It seems that this winter will be a warm one.

Here some broccolis are still growing, chilis, peas (I sowed some very late, now they start fruiting), broad beans (I sowed some in September and some last week), Chinese cabbages, a lot of lettuce, brassicas, cherry radishes, and lamp lettuce.
 

P Suckling

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Hi there, so you are in which state?

I also keep my tomatoes both in the hoop tunnel (main stems removed in early September, but the side shoots are kept for experiments) and outdoors (propagated from side shoots, also for experiments, too.).

The unusual warm weather is somehow funny, our Turkish poppies are growing again. They should enter their dormancy already. Our warm weather will only last for another two days, but it won't become too cold soon. It seems that this winter will be a warm one.

Here some broccolis are still growing, chilis, peas (I sowed some very late, now they start fruiting), broad beans (I sowed some in September and some last week), Chinese cabbages, a lot of lettuce, brassicas, cherry radishes, and lamp lettuce.
Hi Phaedra, sorry for long overdue reply. We had an urgent family matter requiring travelling and so on, but hope to pop by more often now. We are in Bavaria, north East of Munich, just South of the Danube. And yes the weather has only very recently turned wintry. I also had a few spilled pea seeds gamely persisting and giving us a handful here and there, but I think their days are now numbered. Very interesting about your broad beans. I sowed at the time I used to in Britain and half of the newly transplanted broad beans perished in frosts. Learned something. Sow later, but I did not realise how much later you could sow. Well the half that did survive (they were all under a cloche by the way) did fairly well, so no complaints, just a steep learning curve. That sideshoot experiment sounds interesting, are you hoping to overwinter side shoots or what is the experiment? Well the last beans have definitely been picked for this year, time to shell, pack and catalogue on the database. Wish you a nice second Advent this weekend.
 

ninnymary

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Welcome from the San Fransisco bay area! Sorry I'm not a beanaholic. The only beans I grow are pole beans like Blue Lakes or Kentucky Wonder. I do wish I could grow pinto beans since we eat a lot of those but no space in this small city lot and I'm not sure its hot enough for them.

Mary
 

Dahlia

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After 4 decades in England, we have now moved to Germany. To a new generous plot of land and blessed with an artesian well. Slowly getting acquainted with the new soil and the new climate. All my seeds were moved too, especially the bean seeds. Difficult varieties are now often much easier to grow in the warmer and brighter weather of South East Germany. For example the greasy beans which love it here, but were very difficult in England. Limas also do much better here. Predictably, the typical English beans are not as plump and juicy here, but they are ok too.

Looking forward to getting to know everybody in this group and delighted to be sharing our bean adventures.
Welcome to the forum P Suckling from the Pacific Northwest! This forum is the best!
 

Phaedra

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Hi Phaedra, sorry for long overdue reply. We had an urgent family matter requiring travelling and so on, but hope to pop by more often now. We are in Bavaria, north East of Munich, just South of the Danube. And yes the weather has only very recently turned wintry. I also had a few spilled pea seeds gamely persisting and giving us a handful here and there, but I think their days are now numbered. Very interesting about your broad beans. I sowed at the time I used to in Britain and half of the newly transplanted broad beans perished in frosts. Learned something. Sow later, but I did not realise how much later you could sow. Well the half that did survive (they were all under a cloche by the way) did fairly well, so no complaints, just a steep learning curve. That sideshoot experiment sounds interesting, are you hoping to overwinter side shoots or what is the experiment? Well the last beans have definitely been picked for this year, time to shell, pack and catalogue on the database. Wish you a nice second Advent this weekend.
This winter seems quite powerful, I am not sure if the broad beans can survive, even though the variety I chose is (the hardier and much smaller) field beans. I sowed them in different batches.

Those are the earliest - I already harvested their young leaves (I like the young leaves more than the beans). I knew that they would grow too much before winter came, so I cut the main stems short. As expected, their side shoots are developing slowly. I will say they are in comparably good shape.
1076.jpg


Those were sowed much later, however, the autumn this year is also warmer - they still grow too much. Although they survived the snow and frost so far, I will harvest their leaves tomorrow, mulch them, and keep a better chance for the side shoots. The frost that lasts almost half a day (like today) might eventually destroy their stems.

For the side shoots - as it's easy for broad beans to develop side shoots, I am curious to see the performance from the side shoots that successfully overwinter.

1077.jpg
 

P Suckling

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Ah, now I understand. Well best of luck for them. Here we had -13C a few days ago and I wonder whether any would have survived that, even the hardier field beans. But wish you very good luck. Tell us more please how the sideshoots are progressing. Hope they are ok. Greetings.
 

Arthur233

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With such minus temperatures, nothing will survive. That's why they hate winter.
 

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