Harvest garlic/stake bell peppers

hdan

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This evening I was in the garden harvesting garlic that I planted last October.
At that time their's a chance of a thunder storm and high wind gust picking up. I looked over at my pepper plants that wasn't staked & two of them had snapped off. One 2" above the root ball & one in the root ball. The one above the root ball broke in half is a goner with lots of little bell peppers on it. The one in the root ball broke but still attached but trying to save while staking it in place. Also staked the rest of my pepper plants. Didn't have the high wind gust in mine when planted. Oh well, that's how you learn by your mistakes.
Has anyone had that happen before or is it not normal for bell pepper plants to snap like that in high wind.
Feedback is very interesting & educational.
 
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heirloomgal

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I don't get winds that strong, so it's not happened to me @hdan but it is very understandable given how loaded your plants were. I think it's happened occasionally to me with mid sized tomato plants I've had, especially after a rain and all the plant stems are really bulked up with water, seems to make them a little brittle. Congratulations on such a successful pepper load though! That's impressive!
 

flowerbug

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This evening I was in the garden harvesting garlic that I planted last October.
At that time their's a chance of a thunder storm and high wind gust picking up. I looked over at my pepper plants that wasn't staked & two of them had snapped off. One 2" above the root ball & one in the root ball. The one above the root ball broke in half is a goner with lots of little bell peppers on it. The one in the root ball broke but still attached but trying to save while staking it in place. Also staked the rest of my pepper plants. Didn't have the high wind gust in mine when planted. Oh well, that's how you learn by your mistakes.
Has anyone had that happen before or is it not normal for bell pepper plants to snap like that in high wind.
Feedback is very interesting & educational.

the plants here are just getting going after being transplanted, they don't have peppers on them yet, only one is flowering. we've not had much for rains, they're not growing fast because they were pinched off and i'm ok with that because i do want their roots to be more developed.

did you by chance set out really tall plants that were already grown indoors? if so to me that would be the problem because plants grown inside are not going to be exposed to the winds and weather that would develop the stronger stem for the load.

have you grown garlic for many years in your location? it's about 18 years here for me in this place and it could be longer than that by a few years.
 
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hdan

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the plants here are just getting going after being transplanted, they don't have peppers on them yet, only one is flowering. we've not had much for rains, they're not growing fast because they were pinched off and i'm ok with that because i do want their roots to be more developed.

did you by chance set out really tall plants that were already grown indoors? if so to me that would be the problem because plants grown inside are not going to be exposed to the winds and weather that would develop the stronger stem for the load.

have you grown garlic for many years in your location? it's about 18 years here for me in this place and it could be longer than that by a few years.

the plants here are just getting going after being transplanted, they don't have peppers on them yet, only one is flowering. we've not had much for rains, they're not growing fast because they were pinched off and i'm ok with that because i do want their roots to be more developed.

did you by chance set out really tall plants that were already grown indoors? if so to me that would be the problem because plants grown inside are not going to be exposed to the winds and weather that would develop the stronger stem for the load.

have you grown garlic for many years in your location? it's about 18 years here for me in this place and it could be longer than that by a few years.
Hello,
My bell pepper seeds was started indoors 2/19/24. They remained indoors until the night time temperatures was above 55° which came a week after Mothers Day.
My opinion is I planted the seeds a couple weeks too early.
At time of transplant outside 5/23/24 they were a height of 18-20". They were flowering heavily in April as I was cutting flowers off regularly before transplant. After transplant cut largest flowers off for the last time.
Garlic I have been growing last three years. Always have good harvest with my garlic. Very low maintenance crop to grow.
Plant October, harvest June.
I have been planting onion also in October to harvest in Jun, but sometime the weather don't participate with the crop demands
the plants here are just getting going after being transplanted, they don't have peppers on them yet, only one is flowering. we've not had much for rains, they're not growing fast because they were pinched off and i'm ok with that because i do want their roots to be more developed.

did you by chance set out really tall plants that were already grown indoors? if so to me that would be the problem because plants grown inside are not going to be exposed to the winds and weather that would develop the stronger stem for the load.

have you grown garlic for many years in your location? it's about 18 years here for me in this place and it could be longer than that by a few years.

the plants here are just getting going after being transplanted, they don't have peppers on them yet, only one is flowering. we've not had much for rains, they're not growing fast because they were pinched off and i'm ok with that because i do want their roots to be more developed.

did you by chance set out really tall plants that were already grown indoors? if so to me that would be the problem because plants grown inside are not going to be exposed to the winds and weather that would develop the stronger stem for the load.

have you grown garlic for many years in your location? it's about 18 years here for me in this place and it could be longer than that by a few years.
the plants here are just getting going after being transplanted, they don't have peppers on them yet, only one is flowering. we've not had much for rains, they're not growing fast because they were pinched off and i'm ok with that because i do want their roots to be more developed.

did you by chance set out really tall plants that were already grown indoors? if so to me that would be the problem because plants grown inside are not going to be exposed to the winds and weather that would develop the stronger stem for the load.

have you grown garlic for many years in your location? it's about 18 years here for me in this place and it could be longer than that by a few years.
Hello,
My bell pepper seeds was started indoors 2/19/24. They remained indoors until the night time temperatures was above 55° which came a week after Mothers Day.
My opinion is I planted the seeds a couple weeks too early.
At time of transplant outside 5/23/24 they were a height of 18-20". They were flowering heavily in April as I was cutting flowers off regularly before transplant. After transplant cut largest flowers off for the last time.
Garlic I have been growing last three years. Always have good harvest with my garlic. Very low maintenance crop to grow.
Plant October, harvest June.
I have been planting onion also in October to harvest in Jun, but sometime the weather don't participate with the crop demands.
Meaning weather changing from too hot to too cold. Onions can't take temps much lower than 25° where garlic can handle temps -30°.
 

Dahlia

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This evening I was in the garden harvesting garlic that I planted last October.
At that time their's a chance of a thunder storm and high wind gust picking up. I looked over at my pepper plants that wasn't staked & two of them had snapped off. One 2" above the root ball & one in the root ball. The one above the root ball broke in half is a goner with lots of little bell peppers on it. The one in the root ball broke but still attached but trying to save while staking it in place. Also staked the rest of my pepper plants. Didn't have the high wind gust in mine when planted. Oh well, that's how you learn by your mistakes.
Has anyone had that happen before or is it not normal for bell pepper plants to snap like that in high wind.
Feedback is very interesting & educational.
I never had plants break off from high wind, but I did once have my pea plants chewed off about 2 inches above the soil by voles. They didn't even eat the peas - they just left the top of plant there laying in the ground to die! 😡
 

heirloomgal

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My opinion is I planted the seeds a couple weeks too early.
I'm one of those pepper gardeners that thinks there is never too early a start for a pepper! 🤣 Of course, I live in Northern Canada. But something to consider, it isn't uncommon for pepper growers to keep their plants for years and bring them in and out with the seasons, overwintering them as houseplants. More domesticated sweet varieties don't take well to this, but the hots do. I've met pepper growers with habanero plants that are over 5 years old. They are perennials afterall. But more than that, bell peppers are really genetic oddballs in the sense that people have really tinkered with the genetics of the plants. In their natural environment, they grow pea sized fruits, maybe grape sized at most. Bell peppers have been bred to be wildly disproportionate in size to their ancestors. I'd consider it normal that the plants are stressed from the loads they bear, it isn't really natural to them. So, they break or fall over.
 

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