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Discussion in 'Composting & Soil Building' started by ChickenMomma91, Jun 6, 2019.

  1. Jun 7, 2019
    Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Garden Master

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    The pig thing was somewhat in jest, I know it is not practical for many folks. It is the fastest way to get organic matter incorporated into the soil I can think of. Piling organic matter on top of the soil is a good way but it takes time. It will break down faster if it is mixed with the soil and if nitrogen, like manure, is mixed in.

    The way I read ChickenMomma's post she has maybe this year and the next for growing seasons. Maybe she can clarify. The only way I can see good soil improvement is to mix in a lot of compost this year. Not just a few inches thick on top before it is mixed but a lot. For next year incorporating a lot of organic material and especially a lot of manure and mixing it in, then adding more and mixing on more manure and organic material as the season progresses. Water it if it gets dry. Make a huge compost pile and work at it.

    To me, time and money are the issues here. It takes a lot of either to get results. Raised beds may be a better way to go for quick results. Those can get expensive though. For a couple of years is it worth the investment?

    To think someone will have the mortgage paid off before their kid hits kindergarten! WOW!
     
  2. Jun 7, 2019
    ninnymary

    ninnymary Garden Master

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    Ridge, I'm gonna get a pig to help with my soil, :p. By the way, Bee did say to add about a foot of mulch hay.

    I agree with others in just bringing in hay, wood chips or leaves. They are usually free and what do you have to lose?

    Steve, I too was surprised their mortgage is almost paid off. Good for them! Wonder what their secret was? We paid off our house a couple years ago and it's such an amazing feeling and removal of stress.

    Mary
     
    ducks4you likes this.
  3. Jun 8, 2019
    thistlebloom

    thistlebloom Garden Master

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    Not sure if a guinea pig will have the same effect on the soil Mary, but they do make nice little pets.
     
  4. Jun 8, 2019
    baymule

    baymule Garden Master

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    I used pigs and they contributed deep digging and poop. I have used sheep, chicken and horse poop. Leaves, wood chips and cardboard. We have been here 4 years. If you are going to move in a couple of years, I wouldn't fight it and just find someone with a garden if you are going to can, freeze and/or dehydrate. Some of those big tubs that syrup licks for cattle come in make nice garden planting tubs. Look at cow pastures, sometimes you can find them just sitting there, ask the owner, most are happy to get rid of them.
     
    ducks4you and ninnymary like this.
  5. Jun 10, 2019
    ChickenMomma91

    ChickenMomma91 Deeply Rooted

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    I have chickens and the bedding in the coop is a combo of straw and pine chips
     
  6. Jun 10, 2019
    ChickenMomma91

    ChickenMomma91 Deeply Rooted

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    I live in town so a pig wouldn’t be an option. And we have I would guess 4 years total left here. Two to pay it off and another two to finish flipping it for a profit. So at some point I have to make the garden sorta pretty so that a potential buyer would see it as a good thing rather than a big dirt square. It’s 7x15 btw.
     
  7. Jun 10, 2019
    ChickenMomma91

    ChickenMomma91 Deeply Rooted

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    It was a seven year mortgage through a private person rather than a bank. Sadly it won’t show on our credit score except saying we own our home once the title is filed. And we’re older than we look. I’m almost 30. But all the same thank you, it’s been a lot of hard work to keep up.
     
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  8. Jun 10, 2019
    Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Garden Master

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    If you have that long and your purpose is to make it look nice, you have more time than I thought. 7 x 15 can be impressive in town but it's really not all that big. It can still be some work. Pile it with mulch, whether that is dried leaves, grass trimmings if you can get a lot, hay, straw, and especially manure. Wood takes a while to break down but you have time. Till it in or turn it a lot, maybe the top six inches of clay with the mulch. This year you are basically doing a big compost pile.

    When you plant it next year mulch it heavily. When the garden is finished till or dig that mulch in. Within three years it should be nice.
     
  9. Jun 11, 2019
    baymule

    baymule Garden Master

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    Selling a house with a ready make garden is bound to be impressive! Squash, tomatoes and peppers are showy. Plant zinnias and marigolds in it too for color.
     
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  10. Jun 11, 2019
    ducks4you

    ducks4you Garden Master

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    You are a perfect candidate for those raised beds where you import the soil to the location. Build them as cheaply as possible---Lowe's always has leftover wood, I think it is still 25cents/piece--and you can lay cardboard on the ground, put down the perimeters and plant immediately after the soil is in place. I would recommend amending, but if you are low lying it will just flood out. You will have virtually no weeds, so you can enjoy your beds more than me!! :gig
     

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