Hi there,

Varmit

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It's somewhat early am in July in the Mojave Desert. At 7:30 its about 90 with 30% humidity -- that's very high, usually we have 5 to 9% humidity. As far as weather goes, the other important item is wind (W it's called so as not to stir up the weather gods). That about introduces my gardening starting points. For the first in several years I've put in a vegetable garden (small) with a neighbor and are having a good time. Most all was going well until recently when apparently the White Moths brought leaf "miners" and they have worked all over the tomatillos and potatoes. I also have several other questions, after being gone from gardening for a while, but this is my biggest along with not seeing any fruit on the large array of flowered tomatillos. We have had enough W this year to self pollinate everything else ---- corn, etc.
All suggestions for getting rid of them (naturally if possible) are welcome.
I'm intrigued to know how weird the weather is in other areas? I've given up assuming anything for the rest of this year as the cycles and "norms" appear to have been thrown out. We are still in ultra-severe drought (the worst in 1200 years --- I'm quoting a recent and trusted article, so am figuring we're not going to get our annual mid summer rain.
Wishing you all a good year.
 

ducks4you

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I have also learned over the years that some garden plants will be happy waiting in their pots in a couple inches of water, and then you Really water them for several weeks after planting to establish great roots.
This year's tomatoes don't need to be watered anymore. End of season I will need to take photos of their roots to show everyone.
Vegetables need a Lot of water bc their fruit has a lot of water, but, near the surface they don't want to sit in a pond. Make sure that your garden bed(s) drain well.
 

ducks4you

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We have unreliable Springs here and cool weather crops will often bolt too early bc it gets too hot too soon, then waffles between hot and cold, before it gets hot and humid.
We have had some summers that never did get warm, and, in 2012, we had no real winter and I was harvesting leftover 2011 spinach...in March, 2012.
The Best gardening advice I have ever had was an IL Extension (University) webinar on Fall Gardening. I am starting some Fall cool weather crops right now, which seems insane bc it's mid 80's and high humidity.
Cool weather crops are supposed to taste Better after a frost, and I have been told that Spring grown Brussels Sprouts are just bitter.
 

flowerbug

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welcome to TEG from mid-Michigan. :)

you may need some kind of shade in the mid-day, a wind break and mulching will help with retaining soil moisture for those plants that can handle a lot of organic matter. i'm not at all familiar with those plants or pests so i can't speak of how to deal with them.

as far as recent weather goes perhaps you'll get something from the remains of a hurricane. i sure hope so! any rains this time of the year are needed, even here in the mid-west.
 

ZinHead

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I've lived in multiple locations in the Mojave & Sonoran Deserts for over 6 decades.
Remove all damaged leaves & spray (branches, nodes & apical meristem) with (1/2) teaspoon Citric Acid per gallon of water, once a week until full recovery. New leaves will be more insect resistant & heat tolerant. Put up bug zappers & vertical yellow sticky traps & fly traps.

somewhat early am in July in the Mojave Desert. At 7:30 its about 90 with 30% humidity -- that's very high, usually we have 5 to 9% humidity. As far as weather goes, the other important item is wind (W it's called so as not to stir up the weather gods). That about introduces my gardening starting points. For the first in several years I've put in a vegetable garden (small) with a neighbor and are having a good time. Most all was going well until recently when apparently the White Moths brought leaf "miners" and they have worked all over the tomatillos and potatoes. I also have several other questions, after being gone from gardening for a while, but this is my biggest along with not seeing any fruit on the large array of flowered tomatillos. We have had enough W this year to self pollinate everything else ---- corn, etc.
All suggestions for getting rid of them (naturally if possible) are welcome.
I'm intrigued to know how weird the weather is in other areas? I've given up assuming anything for the rest of this year as the cycles and "norms" appear to have been thrown out. We are still in ultra-severe drought (the worst in 1200 years --- I'm quoting a recent and trusted article, so am figuring we're not going to get our annual mid summer rain.
Wishing you all a good year.
 

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