How old are the seeds you just bought?

Pulsegleaner

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Some companies are semi famous for that. The people at Ricter's Herbs in Canada state quite clearly that they DON'T regenerate anything in the Seed Zoo, so what they have is the original seed Joe Simcox gave them (or the first person after Joe to grow it and pass it along.) They keep everything in cold storage, but the fact that Joe hasn't really added anything to the Seed Zoo there in over ten years means what is left is VERY old and potentially iffy (especially for plants for which the "standard" germination level is hard to find out, like capers). I got USED to about a 50% germination rate at best for many of the beans and many were even lower (the Hashuli were about maybe 20, and the Ijevan #1 Runner Beans were zero every time.) Probably 20-30 Amazonian muskmelon shaped peppers went in to the growing trays, only 4 came out. So take care there.
 

heirloomgal

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Location may not change genetics, but seed will adapt to your climate over many years of seed saving..I have seen this myself with seed growing better for me (producing better and growing stronger plants) over years of growing it.
I've experienced this too, especially with peas and beans.
 

heirloomgal

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You know how they say that pelleted seed should be used within a year of purchase? I bought pelleted Lisianthus seed in the autumn of 2021, and when I opened the last packet a few days ago the substance they used to coat the seed had completely disintegrated. I dumped out the glassine seed envelope on to a white saucer, and in among the yellow powder I was able to identify the flower seeds so all was not lost--- but I will be avoiding buying pelleted seed as much as it possible. It does not last, and pelleted seeds cannot be frozen either. So many seed companies are selling pelleted carrot or even lettuce seed now, and I suspect that a lot of folks will have unusable (or difficult to use) seed on their hands after about a year.
Is there a particular reason for the pelleting? I can see how with carrot seed it could help in avoiding later thinning, but is there another purpose other than making the seed more visible?
 

seedcorn

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Location may not change genetics, but seed will adapt to your climate over many years of seed saving..I have seen this myself with seed growing better for me (producing better and growing stronger plants) over years of growing it.
When you save your own seed-especially if you hand pick the plants-you will change the genetics. In the seed industry, keeping the same genetics is the #1 problem. It is why hybrids only last so long.
 

seedcorn

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Some companies are semi famous for that. The people at Ricter's Herbs in Canada state quite clearly that they DON'T regenerate anything in the Seed Zoo, so what they have is the original seed Joe Simcox gave them (or the first person after Joe to grow it and pass it along.) They keep everything in cold storage, but the fact that Joe hasn't really added anything to the Seed Zoo there in over ten years means what is left is VERY old and potentially iffy (especially for plants for which the "standard" germination level is hard to find out, like capers). I got USED to about a 50% germination rate at best for many of the beans and many were even lower (the Hashuli were about maybe 20, and the Ijevan #1 Runner Beans were zero every time.) Probably 20-30 Amazonian muskmelon shaped peppers went in to the growing trays, only 4 came out. So take care there.
If they don’t grow new seed, then they must of had a huge quantity of seed initially.

Seed is pelletized for 3 reasons.
1). Add something the plant needs to germinate-lime on alfalfa seed.
2). Planting ease-clay on small seeds.
3). Since they charge more for pelletized seed-better margins.
 

heirloomgal

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It means that is informative or I learned something. I didn't know why seed was pelleted, other than visibility. I had no idea about the alfalfa and lime combo reason.
 
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