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If You Shop Farmers Market

Discussion in 'The Harvest: Recipes, Canning, Preserving' started by Nyboy, Sep 9, 2018.

  1. Sep 10, 2018
    ninnymary

    ninnymary Garden Master

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    digitS' and Ridgerunner like this.
  2. Sep 11, 2018
    flowerbug

    flowerbug Garden Addicted

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    one reason why i much prefer to just grow things to give away than to get into the market gig. ... we have sold a few things here or there (when we put up tomatoes Mom has sold by the case to some friends to at least recover the cost of the jars), but other than that i just don't want to get into a business. there's enough room here and a good location for a veggie stand. busy enough corner, etc., but to do it would mean a lot of work and having to hire other people to help and once you get into hiring others it can turn into a mess rather quickly. legal issues, insurance, paperwork, ... bleh... i don't have time for that non-sense.

    at least in MI if you want to sell things as being home produced you can do this and clearly mark them as coming from a non-inspected facility. up to some limit in $ (i haven't looked it up but i think it's $10,000). this is clearly labelled and honest in that a person knows what they're getting from where. that's one thing i consider important, another thing is to say what's in it. if it being locally sourced is a selling point i'd be sure to put that on the label.
     
    digitS' and ninnymary like this.
  3. Sep 11, 2018
    Lickbranchfarm

    Lickbranchfarm Deeply Rooted

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    The fact remains unless you grow it yourself, you'll never know where it comes from. All the more reason I would prefer my customers to make their purchase at my farm where they can see what their getting (despite bobm's impression of all farms) I'm slowly gaining a customer base that are repeat customers for a reason, I have no desire to S**T anyone out of their hard earned money for any reason, I don't need to, I earn an honest pay check from a full time job, and farm on the side.
    You would be surprised at how many times some of my customers are excited that they have found somewhere they can buy the things they don't want to grow. Either because they don't want to work In the garden, or their just lazy, who cares, one fact I have found out in life, if your honest, work hard, and provide a consumer a good quality product at a reasonable cost you will succeed. It may take you longer to earn peoples trust, because of low life's, but eventually you will succeed.
     
    ninnymary, Nyboy, Ridgerunner and 2 others like this.
  4. Sep 11, 2018
    Nyboy

    Nyboy Garden Master

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    I have found out in life, if your honest, work hard, and provide a consumer a good quality product at a reasonable cost you will succeed. It may take you longer to earn peoples trust, because of low life's, but eventually you will succeed. So true so true :thumbsup
     
    canesisters and seedcorn like this.

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