Looking for Fava Bean Seeds

ninnymary

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This fall I want to plant some fava beans as a cover crop to build up nitrogen in my soil.

Does anyone have some to give or sell to me?

Baker Creek is out of stock and I hate to pay as much in shipping as for the seeds in other sites. If you know of a site besides Baker Creek that offers free shipping on a package of seeds, please let me know.

Also willing to settle for crimson clover seeds.

Thanks,
Mary
 
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Pulsegleaner

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Do you happen to live near either a Middle eastern supermarket or a health food store? The former may have bags of small favas (which are probably a better choice than big ones if you want them for nitrogen as opposed to food) the latter may have clover seed in the sprouting section.
 

ninnymary

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Do you happen to live near either a Middle eastern supermarket or a health food store? The former may have bags of small favas (which are probably a better choice than big ones if you want them for nitrogen as opposed to food) the latter may have clover seed in the sprouting section.
Don't live near a middle eastern store but there is a small local health food market. But I've never seen dried fava beans.

Mary
 

Pulsegleaner

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like I said, you generally have to find a Middle eastern or at least Mediterranean market at least for the small ones (the big ones can be found in most supermarkets in the Latin foods isle, but as I said, those can be finicky to grow)

I'll be swinging by my local one next Friday. If you want I can try and see if they have any (if I found a bag with the "orange peel" favas I've be buying it anyway). Only thing is we'd be talking about a pound to two pound bag, so the postage would be considerable.
 

ninnymary

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like I said, you generally have to find a Middle eastern or at least Mediterranean market at least for the small ones (the big ones can be found in most supermarkets in the Latin foods isle, but as I said, those can be finicky to grow)

I'll be swinging by my local one next Friday. If you want I can try and see if they have any (if I found a bag with the "orange peel" favas I've be buying it anyway). Only thing is we'd be talking about a pound to two pound bag, so the postage would be considerable.
Thanks Pulsegleaner but I'll pass. I check at health food stores or Whole Foods. So as long as they are small dry ones those should be ok? Do they have a skin on or something?

Mary
 

digitS'

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Here I'm thinking that Mary lives in just the right place to grow fava beans. Mmmm, tasty.

Then, she wants them to turn under and feed the worms! (Maybe you can have some beans off them first?) Anyway, I tried 2 different years and the first year - the aphids really beat them up. See, it's a problem to have things in distant gardens because, I'm not there every day and don't carry around pesticides unless I have to. Additionally, if I forget the insecticidal soap, for example, the pests may have a full week from the time I first notice the plague - to beat up the plants.

Oh, and the 2nd year I had fava beans was one of the hottest and driest in recent memory (something like 2020 🙄). They absolutely burned up. They don't like hot and dry. See, you have good fava growing conditions, Mary. I don't know about winter ... maybe stop in your garden supply store and see if they have field peas if'n you can't find the favas.

Steve
 

ninnymary

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Steve, I'm not sure if I'll be able to eat them. I've read that you have to cut down the plants when they are in bloom. You can either leave the branches on the ground to decompose or chop them up and dig them in so they decompose faster. That's what I'll probably be doing. I want to plant them in September and hope I can turn them under in the spring. I like to plant early so we'll see. First time doing this.

Mary
 

baymule

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@ninnymary I have lots of clover in the pastures. It conditions the soil and gives good grazing in the early spring. I bought 50# bags, I don't think you want that much. Here's where i bought Dutch White clover because I couldn't find it anywhere else. I also have gobs of Crimson Clover, it is beautiful in the spring when it blooms.

 

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