Multi-generation households

digitS'

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Just seeing on teevee that "the highest number of adult children since the Depression are now living with their parents." They quoted Pew Research study.

So, I looked at it. LINK

Notice that the numbers have been going up since a low in the 1960's. (Probably, parents weren't willing to put up with us!) It is a living arrangement much more common in other countries than the US.

Steve
 

Zeedman

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The reversal in the decline of multi-generational households does not surprise me. Nor does it surprise me that there was a large upward spike caused by COVID. What does surprise me, based upon the graphic, is the steady increase & how long ago that trend started... since the 60's???

The economy, rising college debt, and the cost of starting a household undoubtedly factor into that. But are there cultural reasons as well? Is the drive for independence decreasing in the younger generations?
 

digitS'

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Let's think about a few things that were different in 1960.
  • There were no internet or cell services connecting everyone, their bank, heater and nightlight
  • Electric power lines but no natural gas lines
  • No credit cards
  • There were drive-ins but no drive-throughs
  • No keurig machines
  • There were corner markets but no supermarkets in my nearest town of 20,000
  • No sandwich delivery or food delivery of any sort, no pizza parlors
  • A YMCA with a basketball court but no gyms
  • JC Penny, Sears Roebuck, Montgomery Ward, Newberries downtown, no parking lots
  • Cars had gauges but couldn't tell you if your door was closed or tire low
  • No carwash
  • Roads but no interstate
  • Veterinarians but no dog walkers, mobile groomers or pooper scoopers
A multitude of products and ALL these services and many more count towards interdependence.

Steve
who paid less than $150 for a semester of tuition and fees in the 1960's
 

Artichoke Lover

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The younger generations are getting married and starting families much later too. In part because of the basic cost of living is so high but there are other factors. And I would say that there is definitely less of a desire for independence these days.
 

seedcorn

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Things that have Changed. People moved to burbs and city-much less country life. So now kids get out of school with no chores-vs Farm kids. Homes were kitchen, living area, shared bedrooms. Now, many houses have game rooms or at least separate bedrooms as houses are much larger. So why leave? Mom cooks, cleans, washes clothes while parents pay all bills. Very few to no rules, life is good. Plus who wants to start with old fixer up house, older car and no extra money?
 

flowerbug

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The reversal in the decline of multi-generational households does not surprise me. Nor does it surprise me that there was a large upward spike caused by COVID. What does surprise me, based upon the graphic, is the steady increase & how long ago that trend started... since the 60's???

The economy, rising college debt, and the cost of starting a household undoubtedly factor into that. But are there cultural reasons as well? Is the drive for independence decreasing in the younger generations?

i wonder if there is a direct correlation with longevity.
 

AMKuska

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Of all the people my age, I am the only one who is not currently dependent on my parents. I got very lucky. I chose not to go to college due to the incredible cost of it. Nothing I could find in the fields I enjoyed would pay off the huge amount of debt that went with it.

I became a dog groomer, which is practical, and can make a huge amount of money if you are fast enough. My grandparents gave me some money that got me my first car. I invested my money for years and when the housing bubble burst, used the money to buy a house when everything was at its lowest.

I would not have been able to do it without that bubble burst, and without a lot of luck and yes, help from parents.
 

Ridgerunner

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Steve
who paid less than $150 for a semester of tuition and fees in the 1960's

A year at college costs about $1,750 back then Steve. That included tuition, fees, books, room, and board. I lived in the dorm and had a meal ticket that fed me from Sunday night through noon Friday. I did not have a car, I walked. I did not go home often on weekends, that was a two hour trip and friends expected some help with gas money if I caught a ride. Gas was probably about $0.30 per gallon. I learned you can live on a loaf of French bread without getting too hungry. No peanut butter, jelly anything else, just the loaf of bread. It did help that a certain donut shop had a bottomless cup of coffee for a dime. I don't drink coffee with that much milk and sugar these days.

The first year my parents paid for most of it. After that I paid for it all. It took me 7 years to get my four year degree, including time out for work and two years in the army which got me the GI Bill. When I graduated I did not owe anybody anything, then immediately bought a used car on credit, cosigned by my father.

With today's prices and other things, like the electronics you probably have to have for classes, that would be really challenging to do again. Things have changed.
 

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