My first adventure

Collector

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Congratulations on your success from your first try. I have learned more about buckeye trees from this post than I ever thought I would know. I will definitely be keeping up on your progress.
 

Ridgerunner

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I agree sometimes the best time to plant a tree is when you can. It may not be the ideal time, but it may be best for you.

the best time to transplant a tree is where there are no leaves on it.
Isn't this just for deciduous trees? I've read that the best time for evergreens is when they are actively growing, spring and summer. I transplanted three young cedar trees out of a fencerow into the yard to form a screen between me and a neighbor about 1/4 mile away. I did not notice any transplant shock at all.
 

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Aye, there's the rub, ain't it? ;)

The opportune time to plant is never the right time to plant, so sometimes you just have to do it. They have a significant taproot, so you are balancing the risk of the taproot being stunted by air pruning if you leave them in a small pot vs the shock of transplant. Here's my buckeyes for the year, minus the ones I direct planted outside into pots mid-winter. They are all in 1 gal pots and I'll have to plant them in the coming month into those other 6/7 gal pots you saw in that video.
View attachment 40171

If the plant is in a 1 gal pot it will need replanting before summer begins. If it's in a 3 or 5 gal you'll maybe be fine through fall, but I can't be certain. I think in 2019 I took my 1gal pots with trees left in them and covered them with mulch for the summer because I didn't have my in-ground pots ready due to logistic issues that year. I feel that they got burned and stunted that year and suffered for it last year :(

The one question I have for you is do you have an end-game plan? I know sometimes the passion gets in the way of what the end-goal is ;). So, are you planning on planting these in-ground somewhere this year or do you plan to container grow them for another year before giving them to family close by or further away? That may alter how and when to transplant
So I'd like to do what works best for the tree! I know where these are going and could get them planted this year. What I'm struggling with is

Do I plant them now when they are little to help them not get root bound or cause problems with the roots, but then worry about them making it through the winter.

If I keep them in pots would I have to switch them over to bigger pots? I'd worry that I'd damage them in the process. My Aunt bought a Buckeye from a nursery and she tried to winter it in a pot in a barn and she said it didn't survive. Though know I wonder if she didn't give it time as you said they can be a little stubborn and need time lol
 

SprigOfTheLivingDead

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I agree sometimes the best time to plant a tree is when you can. It may not be the ideal time, but it may be best for you.


Isn't this just for deciduous trees? I've read that the best time for evergreens is when they are actively growing, spring and summer. I transplanted three young cedar trees out of a fencerow into the yard to form a screen between me and a neighbor about 1/4 mile away. I did not notice any transplant shock at all.
You're right, I was focused more on deciduous. General rule is "don't plant during summer" since the heat and sun will fry the tree before it gets roots set for drinking in that nice water :)
 

Cricket

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You're right, I was focused more on deciduous. General rule is "don't plant during summer" since the heat and sun will fry the tree before it gets roots set for drinking in that nice water :)
Awesome! Ok this is a stupid question... I know Buckeyes are some of the first to lose their leaves. So if they lose their leave before they are planted is that ok? I know plants need them for energy and growing so I wasn't sure if that was an important thing to help them get established.
 

SprigOfTheLivingDead

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So I'd like to do what works best for the tree! I know where these are going and could get them planted this year. What I'm struggling with is

Do I plant them now when they are little to help them not get root bound or cause problems with the roots, but then worry about them making it through the winter.

If I keep them in pots would I have to switch them over to bigger pots? I'd worry that I'd damage them in the process. My Aunt bought a Buckeye from a nursery and she tried to winter it in a pot in a barn and she said it didn't survive. Though know I wonder if she didn't give it time as you said they can be a little stubborn and need time lol
Died in the barn for a number of reasons: got too cold, soil dried out too much, ... if you're going to overwinter containerized trees it's best to insulate (protect the sides) them and water them until their dormancy begins.

If I were you I'd either plant them right now in their final spots or transfer them to a 3-5gal pot while disturbing the root mass as little as possible in the process. Then you can plant them into their final spots after they lose their leaves later this year
 

Cricket

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Died in the barn for a number of reasons: got too cold, soil dried out too much, ... if you're going to overwinter containerized trees it's best to insulate (protect the sides) them and water them until their dormancy begins.

If I were you I'd either plant them right now in their final spots or transfer them to a 3-5gal pot while disturbing the root mass as little as possible in the process. Then you can plant them into their final spots after they lose their leaves later this year
Sounds good! I think I'll attempt closer to fall when it's not so hot and do my best to not ruin the roots 😬 lol.
 

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Congratulations on your success from your first try. I have learned more about buckeye trees from this post than I ever thought I would know. I will definitely be keeping up on your progress.
Thank you so much for the kind words. It's been an exciting process and I'm excited to share the journey!!
 

flowerbug

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Awesome! Ok this is a stupid question... I know Buckeyes are some of the first to lose their leaves. So if they lose their leave before they are planted is that ok? I know plants need them for energy and growing so I wasn't sure if that was an important thing to help them get established.

if you have multiple trees to work with and don't mind experimenting you can also trim off most of the leaves when transplanting so that the respiration draw for moisture is not so great a burden for the roots to supply while they are healing up from any injuries experienced during transplanting.

this is a similar concept i've always used when repotting house-plants, that you don't want the roots and leavest to be too out of balance and if there is a question it is usually ok to leave more root and trim the top back a bit more so that there isn't so much stress until the plant recovers. of course this all can vary based upon plant/tree types. like i don't think i've ever managed to kill a cedar tree here - but we often get regular rains - so if watered after transplanting they shrug off whatever i do to them. :)
 

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