New Garden Art for me

Carol Dee

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On a cleanup day here #1 son showed up with this, FOR ME ! :) It was found in the back of his shed after he purchased his Grandparent's home. DH remembers it belonging to his Grandparents . It has no rust holes! (Maybe because they used it for cement and it has a nice protective layer of cement left in it.) I will not drill holes in it so no planting flower directly in it, I might just set potted plants in it. :love
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so lucky

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Nice, Carol Dee! Yes, I think pots of plants would work well. Is there any worry about water standing in the bottom after rains?
 

Carol Dee

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Nice, Carol Dee! Yes, I think pots of plants would work well. Is there any worry about water standing in the bottom after rains?
YES, no drainage, that is why I think pots, they can be set out and barrow tipped to clear standing water.
 

Marie2020

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YES, no drainage, that is why I think pots, they can be set out and barrow tipped to clear standing water.
Personally I would fill the bottom with heavy stones to help the draining during rainfall.
 

flowerbug

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YES, no drainage, that is why I think pots, they can be set out and barrow tipped to clear standing water.
if you put a tube filled with water and a cork in the end to keep it from completely draining then you can use that as a siphon when it does get water in it. if you put a cup of water over the end to regulate the water level then you won't need a cork either, but you'd want to change the water once in a while to keep mosquitoes out of it.
 

Marie2020

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if you put a tube filled with water and a cork in the end to keep it from completely draining then you can use that as a siphon when it does get water in it. if you put a cup of water over the end to regulate the water level then you won't need a cork either, but you'd want to change the water once in a while to keep mosquitoes out of it.
That's new on me. If you could get a picture in here as an example I would really appreciate that. Still a learner here :)
 

flowerbug

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That's new on me. If you could get a picture in here as an example I would really appreciate that. Still a learner here :)
a siphon is a U shaped hollow tube (it can be upside down or not). if you have two buckets next to each other with varying amounts of water in them and then connect them with a siphon full of water they will equalize the water level between them.

this is the basis for something called a water level too, which is a very useful thing to know how to use if you like to play with fountains, streams, building, etc.

anyways, back to the wheelbarrow situation, you'll have to use an upside down siphon if you don't want to drill a hole in the wheelbarrow (or a pump, or bail it out, or dump it out), but i was thinking of something that could be done which would automagically keep the wheelbarrow mostly empty that doesn't require any moving parts at all. the upside down siphon has to have both ends submerged in water, but it can be a fairly small tube too so that means not much water at all has to be left in the wheelbarrow. the other end of the tube goes over the lip of the wheelbarrow and into a container outside along side the wheelbarrow and you adjust how high the lip or drain hole of this container is as to how high you want the water in the wheelbarrow to get. when it rains or you water the plants in the wheelbarrow it raises the level of the water in the wheelbarrow and that then flows out the siphon and out the drain hole in the container on the outside. :)
 

digitS'

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You could tip the wheelbarrow on its side - note that the top is wider than the bottom. That would allow complete draining.

Once tipped, level the "floor" of the art piece perhaps with rocks, large in the front, smaller in the back.

The pots would then set level.

I see this sort of thing usually with large pots positioned partly on their sides in flower beds. Tipped. It seems like I have seen that with wheelbarrows, also. It can look as tho the wheelbarrow or pot has tipped and something is spilling out - artistically, a mass of flowering plants.

Steve
 

flowerbug

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You could tip the wheelbarrow on its side - note that the top is wider than the bottom. That would allow complete draining.

Once tipped, level the "floor" of the art piece perhaps with rocks, large in the front, smaller in the back.

The pots would then set level.

I see this sort of thing usually with large pots positioned partly on their sides in flower beds. Tipped. It seems like I have seen that with wheelbarrows, also. It can look as tho the wheelbarrow or pot has tipped and something is spilling out - artistically, a mass of flowering plants.

Steve
yeah, i like that idea, like the cornicopias (no, i'm not going to look up how to spell that - i'm going to bed :) (well ok, in a few moments i want to see if i can write up some observations of some bean seeds/varieties first :) )) :) :) :)
 

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