Official TEG Poll: What Are Your Plans For 2021?

What Are Your Plans For 2021?

  • Buy more garden tools

    Votes: 3 18.8%
  • Start a garden journal

    Votes: 8 50.0%
  • Plant a fruit tree/s

    Votes: 6 37.5%
  • Improve Water Conservation

    Votes: 4 25.0%
  • Invite local wildlife into your garden

    Votes: 5 31.3%
  • Use environmentally friendly pesticides

    Votes: 5 31.3%
  • Start a compost pile

    Votes: 5 31.3%
  • Declutter my garden shed

    Votes: 7 43.8%
  • Other (elaborate in the comments section)

    Votes: 7 43.8%

  • Total voters
    16

TEG Project Manager

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It's hard to believe another year is passing. As the popular old saying goes, “There’s always next year.” Garden management, the environment, infrastructure? Identifying areas in need of improvement is always a must in most areas of life. And the same goes when it comes to your garden. As 2020 bids us goodbye, what are your plans for 2021 when it comes to your beloved garden?

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Here's another exciting 2021 Resolutions Poll.
 

flowerbug

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i would love to not have any projects hanging over me, but that's rarely the case. i need to figure out some erosion issues and the end of the drive needs some work or we may fill in the front ditch entirely. depends upon the regulations, contract, bids, etc.

i am very glad that we did finish some of the bigger projects already so it has made life easier each year as i make progress.

also some better fencing would be nice to get put up around the SE corner and up the S side. this would make any groundhog incursions much more infrequent but would also possibly trap deer so i have to think more about this.

gardens, yes, i need to reclaim more garden space from some weeds/grasses that have taken over while i was working on another project. i'm about halfway done with that.

finish up projects inside the fenced gardens and in the north garden.

work along the ditch line getting things trimmed back again and some vines removed or cut back, cut back some of the honeysuckle bushes along the fences. remove trees sprouting along there. cleaning up other hazards as i can get to them.

remove some old carpeting that is now falling apart. i didn't want it to begin with. ugh. messes always from what Mom thinks are good ideas and end up being a ton more work in the long run. i just want to keep it simple. heh. oh well, keeps me outta trouble...

continue to work on the north garden edges to fill them in with creeping thyme, keep everything weeded and then ready to plant for veggie growing season.

bean cross breeding projects continue. growouts for the LEBN and others if i have space.

today, the last day of 2020 my first goal is to finish dusting the floor. then to feed the worms of some food scraps and then i dunno. :)

cheers and have fun. :)
 

Zeedman

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I don't really keep a garden journal per se, but I do have an elaborate system of documenting traits for varieties in my collection, patterned after the descriptor data used by the USDA - which I've only been halfheartedly following for the last few years. So as I regrow varieties, I will be making greater effort to fill in the blanks. That especially includes more photos. Also organizing the 15-years-worth of photos I already have by variety (they are organized by date at present) which is a work in progress... something constructive to do while the garden is frozen.

DW & I planted several fruit trees last year, but still intend to put in a couple more. And as mentioned on other threads, with much of my small wood lot dying due to the emerald ash borer, I will be starting seedlings for trees & shrubs to replace them. Hawthorne for sure, and possibly elderberry & mulberry - all from rooted cuttings. Possibly black locust or other thorny trees as well, something likely to resist the deer which pass through my yard.

Invite wildlife into my garden??? That would defeat the whole purpose of fencing! :lol: Feathers always welcome, fur keep out! (Except cats, which are always welcome.)

The gardens are constantly evolving, so this year is no exception. At home, I am expanding one of the vegetable plots; this will involve removal of a stump, cutting down a tree which shades that area, and bringing in topsoil to increase drainage. I've also begun adding charcoal from the fire pit to that garden, gypsum to improve workability, and larger amounts of shredded organic matter.

The rural garden will continue to be challenging. The horrible weed pressure experienced last year will undoubtedly return, but since we allowed nothing to seed last year, hopefully it will be more manageable. We will still be bringing in more topsoil, to further address the drainage issues of that garden. This plot has been cultivated since 2005, so starting this year, we will begin adding larger amounts of organic matter... now that we finally have the equipment to handle the large quantities required for that plot (5900 square feet).

As demonstrated by some of the germination rates last year, much of the older seed in my collection is desperately in need of renewal. Some varieties will need intensive TLC to rescue; I'm beginning germination tests now to identify those. And after the problems last year, we will be starting backup transplants for almost everything - especially beans.

One possible major project. We have been looking for an affordable front-load tractor; if we find one, that will be the start of a complete re-landscaping of our drainage-challenged back yard. I've always had access to topsoil, just not the means to move large amounts without testing my aging vertebrae. :old
 

Zeedman

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@flowerbug , because of the size of the project & the number of days it would take (possibly all summer) it makes more sense to buy one, have it available whenever needed - then sell it when done. Then too, I anticipate taking down about 50 dying ash trees soon; so I may just keep it awhile. Time will tell, I'm not in position to start counting those chickens just yet. ;)
 

baymule

Garden Master
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I’m going to plant a bigger purple hull pea patch this year. Peas are a staple food in the south. We sold some, gave more away from the 2020 garden. Going to plant a bigger Painted Mountain corn patch too. It makes the best cornbread. I have several purple prodded green bean varieties, sent to me by generous members here, that I will plant. I’m looking for my “perfect” canning green bean.
 

ninnymary

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I am rearranging my beds. This will expand my 7 tomatoes to about 13, almost double! So I'm very excited about that. I will most likely retire the end of December and will have the space where the climbing play structure is for future squash. It will be wonderful to have space for my zucchini. I currently squish it in a 4x4 and it constantly goes over the walkway.

I planted an apricot tree this summer which should give me a few apricots this year.


Gotta find space for my zinnias though now that tomatoes will take over that space.

Mary
 
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